Duration effect of obsessive-compulsive disorder on cognitive function

A functional MRI study

Tomohiro Nakao, Akiko Nakagawa, Takashi Yoshiura, Eriko Nakatani, Maiko Nabeyama, Hirokuni Sanematsu, Osamu Togao, Kazuko Yoshioka, Mayumi Tomita, Toshihide Kuroki, Shigenobu Kanba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The inconsistency of previous reports examining cognitive function in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) suggests its heterogeneity. In this study, we examined the effect of illness duration on cognitive function in OCD. Methods: We examined the cognitive function of 32 OCD patients and 16 healthy volunteers by neuropsychological tests and functional magnetic resonance imaging while they performed the Stroop and N-back tasks to assess attention and nonverbal memory. The patients were divided into two groups by illness duration: a short-term group (n=17, 5.5±3.1 years) and a long-term group (n=15, 20.3±6.1 years). Statistical analysis was performed to determine the differences between these two groups and the normal control group (n=16). Results: The long-term group showed attention deficit and nonverbal memory dysfunction on the neuropsychological tests. In contrast, on functional magnetic resonance imaging, the short-term group showed weaker activation of the right caudate during the Stroop task and stronger activation of the right dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex during the N-back task than the long-term and normal control groups. Conclusions: The results suggested that abnormal brain activation occurs in the early phase of OCD and that the long-term persistence of OCD might involve a decline in cognitive function.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)814-823
Number of pages10
JournalDepression and Anxiety
Volume26
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2009

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Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Cognition
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Neuropsychological Tests
Control Groups
Memory Disorders
Prefrontal Cortex
Healthy Volunteers
Brain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Nakao, T., Nakagawa, A., Yoshiura, T., Nakatani, E., Nabeyama, M., Sanematsu, H., ... Kanba, S. (2009). Duration effect of obsessive-compulsive disorder on cognitive function: A functional MRI study. Depression and Anxiety, 26(9), 814-823. https://doi.org/10.1002/da.20484

Duration effect of obsessive-compulsive disorder on cognitive function : A functional MRI study. / Nakao, Tomohiro; Nakagawa, Akiko; Yoshiura, Takashi; Nakatani, Eriko; Nabeyama, Maiko; Sanematsu, Hirokuni; Togao, Osamu; Yoshioka, Kazuko; Tomita, Mayumi; Kuroki, Toshihide; Kanba, Shigenobu.

In: Depression and Anxiety, Vol. 26, No. 9, 01.09.2009, p. 814-823.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nakao, T, Nakagawa, A, Yoshiura, T, Nakatani, E, Nabeyama, M, Sanematsu, H, Togao, O, Yoshioka, K, Tomita, M, Kuroki, T & Kanba, S 2009, 'Duration effect of obsessive-compulsive disorder on cognitive function: A functional MRI study', Depression and Anxiety, vol. 26, no. 9, pp. 814-823. https://doi.org/10.1002/da.20484
Nakao, Tomohiro ; Nakagawa, Akiko ; Yoshiura, Takashi ; Nakatani, Eriko ; Nabeyama, Maiko ; Sanematsu, Hirokuni ; Togao, Osamu ; Yoshioka, Kazuko ; Tomita, Mayumi ; Kuroki, Toshihide ; Kanba, Shigenobu. / Duration effect of obsessive-compulsive disorder on cognitive function : A functional MRI study. In: Depression and Anxiety. 2009 ; Vol. 26, No. 9. pp. 814-823.
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