Dynamic intensity borrowing induced by coherent molecular vibration observed by sub-5-fs spectroscopy

H. Kano, T. Saito, T. Kobayashi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Summary form only given. J-aggregates of organic molecules are of great interest because of their ultrafast and large optical nonlinearity induced by the excitonic resonance and superradiance. Among J-aggregates composed of various aromatic or macrocyclic compounds, tetraphenylporphine tetrasulfonic acid (TPPS) J-aggregates are of special interest since they are model substances for aggregates of the light-harvesting antenna chlorophyll with a storage ring configuration in photosynthesis. The absorption spectrum of TPPS aggregates shows a relatively weak band in the red region and much stronger peaks in the blue-near ultraviolet, denoted as Q- and B-bands, respectively, composing a quasi-two-band Frenkel exciton system. In the present study, we observed for the first time dynamic intensity borrowing which results in the modulation of the Q-transition dipole moment.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationTechnical Digest - Summaries of Papers Presented at the Quantum Electronics and Laser Science Conference, QELS 2001
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages179-180
Number of pages2
ISBN (Electronic)155752663X, 9781557526632
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001
EventQuantum Electronics and Laser Science Conference, QELS 2001 - Baltimore, United States
Duration: May 6 2001May 11 2001

Publication series

NameTechnical Digest - Summaries of Papers Presented at the Quantum Electronics and Laser Science Conference, QELS 2001

Conference

ConferenceQuantum Electronics and Laser Science Conference, QELS 2001
CountryUnited States
CityBaltimore
Period5/6/015/11/01

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Radiation

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