Dynamic Pitch Perception for Complex Tones of Periodic Spectral Patterns

Yoshitaka Nakajima, Hiroyuk Minami, Takash Tsumura, Hiroshi Kunisaki, Shigek Ohnishi, Ryunen Teranishi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pitch circularity as found in Shepard tones was examined by using complex tones that had various degrees of exactness in their spectral periodicities on the logarithmic frequency dimension. This dimension was divided into periods of 1400 cents by tone components, and each period was subdivided into two parts of a fixed ratio of 700:700, 600:800, 550:850, 500:900, 450:950, 400:1000, or 0:1400. Subjects made paired comparison judgments for pitch. When the subdividing ratio was 0:1400 or 400:1000, the subjects responded to the spectral periodicity of 1400 cents, and, when the ratio was 700:700 or 600:800, they responded to the periodicity of 700 cents. Some seemingly intermediate cases between these two extremes or some qualitatively different cases were obtained in the other conditions. As we have asserted before, the human ear appears to detect a global pitch movement when some tone components move in the same direction by similar degrees on the logarithmic frequency dimension.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)291-314
Number of pages24
JournalMusic Perception
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 1991

Fingerprint

Spectrality
Pitch Perception
Intermediate
Circularity
Ear

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Music

Cite this

Nakajima, Y., Minami, H., Tsumura, T., Kunisaki, H., Ohnishi, S., & Teranishi, R. (1991). Dynamic Pitch Perception for Complex Tones of Periodic Spectral Patterns. Music Perception, 8(3), 291-314. https://doi.org/10.2307/40285504

Dynamic Pitch Perception for Complex Tones of Periodic Spectral Patterns. / Nakajima, Yoshitaka; Minami, Hiroyuk; Tsumura, Takash; Kunisaki, Hiroshi; Ohnishi, Shigek; Teranishi, Ryunen.

In: Music Perception, Vol. 8, No. 3, 01.01.1991, p. 291-314.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nakajima, Y, Minami, H, Tsumura, T, Kunisaki, H, Ohnishi, S & Teranishi, R 1991, 'Dynamic Pitch Perception for Complex Tones of Periodic Spectral Patterns', Music Perception, vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 291-314. https://doi.org/10.2307/40285504
Nakajima Y, Minami H, Tsumura T, Kunisaki H, Ohnishi S, Teranishi R. Dynamic Pitch Perception for Complex Tones of Periodic Spectral Patterns. Music Perception. 1991 Jan 1;8(3):291-314. https://doi.org/10.2307/40285504
Nakajima, Yoshitaka ; Minami, Hiroyuk ; Tsumura, Takash ; Kunisaki, Hiroshi ; Ohnishi, Shigek ; Teranishi, Ryunen. / Dynamic Pitch Perception for Complex Tones of Periodic Spectral Patterns. In: Music Perception. 1991 ; Vol. 8, No. 3. pp. 291-314.
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