Dynamics of microdroplets over the surface of hot water

Takahiro Umeki, Masahiko Ohata, Hiizu Nakanishi, Masatoshi Ichikawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

When drinking a cup of coffee under the morning sunshine, you may notice white membranes of steam floating on the surface of the hot water. They stay notably close to the surface and appear to almost stick to it. Although the membranes whiffle because of the air flow of rising steam, peculiarly fast splitting events occasionally occur. They resemble cracking to open slits approximately 1 mm wide in the membranes, and leave curious patterns. We studied this phenomenon using a microscope with a high-speed video camera and found intriguing details: i) the white membranes consist of fairly monodispersed small droplets of the order of 10 μm; ii) they levitate above the water surface by 10 ∼ 100 μm; iii) the splitting events are a collective disappearance of the droplets, which propagates as a wave front of the surface wave with a speed of 1 ∼ 2 m/s; and iv) these events are triggered by a surface disturbance, which results from the disappearance of a single droplet.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages1
JournalScientific reports
Volume5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

membranes
steam
water
coffee
drinking
morning
air flow
guy wires
wave fronts
surface water
floating
surface waves
slits
disturbances
cameras
microscopes
high speed

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Cite this

Dynamics of microdroplets over the surface of hot water. / Umeki, Takahiro; Ohata, Masahiko; Nakanishi, Hiizu; Ichikawa, Masatoshi.

In: Scientific reports, Vol. 5, 01.01.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Umeki, Takahiro ; Ohata, Masahiko ; Nakanishi, Hiizu ; Ichikawa, Masatoshi. / Dynamics of microdroplets over the surface of hot water. In: Scientific reports. 2015 ; Vol. 5.
@article{4b3864dcb63143388551d04861547a2d,
title = "Dynamics of microdroplets over the surface of hot water",
abstract = "When drinking a cup of coffee under the morning sunshine, you may notice white membranes of steam floating on the surface of the hot water. They stay notably close to the surface and appear to almost stick to it. Although the membranes whiffle because of the air flow of rising steam, peculiarly fast splitting events occasionally occur. They resemble cracking to open slits approximately 1 mm wide in the membranes, and leave curious patterns. We studied this phenomenon using a microscope with a high-speed video camera and found intriguing details: i) the white membranes consist of fairly monodispersed small droplets of the order of 10 μm; ii) they levitate above the water surface by 10 ∼ 100 μm; iii) the splitting events are a collective disappearance of the droplets, which propagates as a wave front of the surface wave with a speed of 1 ∼ 2 m/s; and iv) these events are triggered by a surface disturbance, which results from the disappearance of a single droplet.",
author = "Takahiro Umeki and Masahiko Ohata and Hiizu Nakanishi and Masatoshi Ichikawa",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/srep08046",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
journal = "Scientific Reports",
issn = "2045-2322",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dynamics of microdroplets over the surface of hot water

AU - Umeki, Takahiro

AU - Ohata, Masahiko

AU - Nakanishi, Hiizu

AU - Ichikawa, Masatoshi

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - When drinking a cup of coffee under the morning sunshine, you may notice white membranes of steam floating on the surface of the hot water. They stay notably close to the surface and appear to almost stick to it. Although the membranes whiffle because of the air flow of rising steam, peculiarly fast splitting events occasionally occur. They resemble cracking to open slits approximately 1 mm wide in the membranes, and leave curious patterns. We studied this phenomenon using a microscope with a high-speed video camera and found intriguing details: i) the white membranes consist of fairly monodispersed small droplets of the order of 10 μm; ii) they levitate above the water surface by 10 ∼ 100 μm; iii) the splitting events are a collective disappearance of the droplets, which propagates as a wave front of the surface wave with a speed of 1 ∼ 2 m/s; and iv) these events are triggered by a surface disturbance, which results from the disappearance of a single droplet.

AB - When drinking a cup of coffee under the morning sunshine, you may notice white membranes of steam floating on the surface of the hot water. They stay notably close to the surface and appear to almost stick to it. Although the membranes whiffle because of the air flow of rising steam, peculiarly fast splitting events occasionally occur. They resemble cracking to open slits approximately 1 mm wide in the membranes, and leave curious patterns. We studied this phenomenon using a microscope with a high-speed video camera and found intriguing details: i) the white membranes consist of fairly monodispersed small droplets of the order of 10 μm; ii) they levitate above the water surface by 10 ∼ 100 μm; iii) the splitting events are a collective disappearance of the droplets, which propagates as a wave front of the surface wave with a speed of 1 ∼ 2 m/s; and iv) these events are triggered by a surface disturbance, which results from the disappearance of a single droplet.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84923166575&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84923166575&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/srep08046

DO - 10.1038/srep08046

M3 - Article

VL - 5

JO - Scientific Reports

JF - Scientific Reports

SN - 2045-2322

ER -