Early application of related SCT might improve clinical outcome in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma

S. Fuji, H. Fujiwara, N. Nakano, A. Wake, Y. Inoue, T. Fukuda, M. Hidaka, Y. Moriuchi, T. Miyamoto, N. Uike, J. Taguchi, T. Eto, T. Tomoyose, T. Kondo, A. Yamanoha, T. Ichinohe, Y. Atsuta, A. Utsunomiya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (allo-HSCT) is a curative treatment for aggressive adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). Considering the dismal prognosis associated with conventional chemotherapies, early application of allo-HSCT might be beneficial for patients with ATLL. However, no previous study has addressed the optimal timing of allo-HSCT from related donors. Hence, to evaluate the impact of timing of allo-HSCT for patients with ATLL, we retrospectively analyzed data from patients with ATLL who received an allo-HSCT from a related donor. The median age was 52 years. Patients were grouped according to the interval from diagnosis to allo-HSCT: early transplant group, <100 days, n=72; late transplant group, ≥100 days, n=428. The corresponding constituents of disease status were not statistically different between the two groups (P=0.11). The probability of OS in the early transplant group was significantly higher than that in the late transplant group (4-year OS, 49.3% vs 31.2%). Multivariate analysis revealed that late allo-HSCT was an unfavorable prognostic factor for OS (hazard ratio, 1.46; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01-2.11; P=0.04). Despite the limitations of a retrospective study, it might be acceptable to consider early application of allo-HSCT for ATLL.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)205-211
Number of pages7
JournalBone Marrow Transplantation
Volume51
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2016

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Hematology
  • Transplantation

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