Effect of diet on changes in small intestinal blood flow following intracolonic administration of indomethacin to rats

C. Yamamoto, K. Kawakubo, K. Aoyagi, T. Matsumoto, M. Iida, S. Ibayashi, T. Kitazono, K. Doi, K. Kanamoto, M. Fujishima

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Liquid diet (LD) is known to be protective against indomethacin-induced enteropathy, which is thought to be associated with ischemic change. We tested the hypothesis that the solid component of diet modulates small intestinal blood flow (SIBF) following indomethacin administration. In the first experiment, male Wistar rats were divided into 18-hr-fasted and normal diet groups. Indomethacin (20 mg/kg) or vehicle was administered intracolonically. SIBF was measured on both the mesenteric and antimesenteric sides of the intestine, using the hydrogen gas clearance method. In the second experiment, rats were given LD alone or LD with increasing concentration of soluble/insoluble fiber for seven days. The baseline SIBF was significantly higher in the groups with normal diet and LD with fiber than in the fasting and LD groups. Following indomethacin administration, SIBF gradually decreased in the groups with normal diet and LD with insoluble fiber, while neither liquid diet nor fasting reduced SIBF. There was no difference in SIBF between the mesenteric and antimesenteric sides of the intestine in any group. Our findings suggest that solid components of diet increase basal SIBF and decrease SIBF following indomethacin administration.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)200-207
    Number of pages8
    JournalDigestive Diseases and Sciences
    Volume46
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Mar 28 2001

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Physiology
    • Gastroenterology

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Effect of diet on changes in small intestinal blood flow following intracolonic administration of indomethacin to rats'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this