Effect of Dietary Fats on Cholesterol Metabolism and Eicosanoid Production in Hamsters Fed Undigested Fraction of Soybean Protein

Marites Gatchalian-Yee, Misako Imamura, Michiko Nonaka, Jiong Yan Gu, Michihiro Sugano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The undigested fraction of soybean protein (UDF) exerts a markedly greater hypocholesterolemic effect than soybean protein itself in rats. The present study was undertaken to confirm the effect in hamsters, a more appropriate animal model for human cholesterol metabolism. Hamsters were given diets containing UDF at a nitrogen level equivalent to the 20% casein diet. Dietary fats, at the 10% level, were perilla oil and safflower oil. There was apparently no increase in the serum and liver cholesterol levels in both groups of animals cholesterol-enriched diets that had been fed for 38 days. Fecal excretion of neutral and acidic steroid tended to be higher in the perilla oil group than in the safflower oil group. The perilla oil group significantly increased 20: 5n-3 in liver phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine accompanying a decrease in 20: 4n-6. Such changes were not so evident in liver phosphatidylinositol. The production of leukotriene B4 and the concentration of prostaglandin E2 in the spleen were higher in the safflower oil group than in the perilla oil group. Thus, the hypocholesterolemic effect of the undigested fraction of soybean protein was apparently reproduced even in hamsters. Dietary fat-induced changes in lipid parameters in hamsters resembled those observed in rats.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)499-504
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Nutritional Science and Vitaminology
Volume40
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1994

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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