Effect of Force and Acoustic Feedback on Teleoperation Work

Z. Cui, K. Matsunaga, Kazunori Shidoji

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

It has been reported that the operation efficiency during teleoperation under stereoscopic video images is inferior to that of using the naked eye on the spot in real working environments. One of the reasons to explain this might be the smaller amount of information which is provided to the subject when working under stereoscopic images compared with that gotten by direct viewing in the real working environment. In our daily lives, we obtain information through various senses; the visual sense, acoustical sense, tactile sense and so on. The smaller amount of information causes a low working performance in the teleoperation. Some papers showed the improvement of operation efficiency when the subject got acoustic and/or tactile feedback as well as visual feedback in a simulated environment. We investigated to clarify the effects of force and acoustic feedback information with stereoscopic video images to subjects on the performance of the teleoperation using an actual robot. In experiment 1, we used the teleoperated system in which subjects could control the robot arm (the slave manipulator) to pick up cylindrical objects and to insert them in a hole by operating the input-and-tactile-information-display-system (the master manipulator). The results of experiment 1 showed that the force and acoustic information did not improve the working performance, and rather interfered with it. In experiment 2, we investigated the operation efficiency under conditions that force or acoustic feedback was given in the teleoperated work by eliminating contact information acquirable from vision. As a result of the experiment, force and acoustic information was not an effective way to shorten the completion time when the actual teleoperated robot was used.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)400-407
Number of pages8
JournalProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume5007
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 20 2003
EventHuman Vision and Electronic Imaging VIII - Santa Clara, CA, United States
Duration: Jan 21 2003Jan 24 2003

Fingerprint

Teleoperation
Remote control
Acoustics
Feedback
acoustics
Robots
Manipulators
Experiments
Robot
Manipulator
robots
Experiment
manipulators
robot arms
Display devices
Completion Time
display devices
inserts
Display
Contact

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Effect of Force and Acoustic Feedback on Teleoperation Work. / Cui, Z.; Matsunaga, K.; Shidoji, Kazunori.

In: Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, Vol. 5007, 20.11.2003, p. 400-407.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

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