Effect of magnetic braking on circumstellar disk formation in a strongly magnetized cloud

Masahiro N. Machida, Shu Ichiro Inutsuka, Tomoaki Matsumoto

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99 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using resistive magnetohydrodynamics simulation, we consider circumstellar disk formation in a strongly magnetized cloud. As the initial state, an isolated cloud core embedded in a low-density interstellar medium with a uniform magnetic field was adopted. The cloud evolution was calculated until almost all gas inside the initial cloud fell onto either the circumstellar disk or a protostar, and a part of the gas was ejected into the interstellar medium by the protostellar outflow driven by the circumstellar disk. In the early main accretion phase, the disk size is limited to ∼10AU because the angular momentum of the circumstellar disk is effectively transferred by both magnetic braking and the protostellar outflow. In the later main accretion phase, however, the circumstellar disk grows rapidly and exceeds ≳100AU by the end of the main accretion phase. This rapid growth of the circumstellar disk is caused by depletion of the infalling envelope, while magnetic braking is effective when the infalling envelope is more massive than the circumstellar disk. The infalling envelope cannot brake the circumstellar disk when the latter is more massive than the former. In addition, the protostellar outflow weakens and disappears in the later main accretion phase, because the outflow is powered by gas accretion onto the circumstellar disk. Although the circumstellar disk formed in a magnetized cloud is considerably smaller than that in an unmagnetized cloud, a circumstellar disk exceeding 100AU can form even in a strongly magnetized cloud.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)555-573
Number of pages19
JournalPublications of the Astronomical Society of Japan
Volume63
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 25 2011

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Space and Planetary Science

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