Effect of maxillary protracting bow appliance on reversed occlusion in deciduous dentition

K. Hirota, K. Abe, Y. Hirano, K. Nonaka, T. Murakami, M. Nakata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Previously we investigated the frequency of malocclusion in children who visited the Pedodontic Clinic of Kyushu University and the types of appliances to treat the reversed occlusion in deciduous dentition. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of the maxillary protracting bow appliance to the reversed occlusion in deciduous dentition. Patients at the Hellman's dental age IIA and without molar cross-bite were selected. Eleven patients (6 males and 5 females) were treated with the maxillary protracting bow appliance, and 9 patients (5 males and 4 females) were treated with the chin cap. The controls were 15 patients (5 males and 10 females) without, distal step type of terminal plane, caries and malocclusion. For the sake of evaluation, the study models and lateral cephalograms were analyzed, which were taken before and after the correction of reversed occlusion. The results were as follows: 1. The effects of maxillary protracting bow appliance were the maxillary forward movement associated with counter-clockwise rotation of the nasal floor and the mandibular backward movement associated with clockwise rotation. 2. The maxillary protracting caused the labial inclination of the primary incisors in the maxilla, but the dental arch length was reduced by the mesial movement of the primary second molars in the maxilla. 3. From the results of multiple regression analysis in the maxillary protracting group, it was indicated that the increase of the overjet was attributable to the change of angles of SN-GN, SNB, SNA and GZN.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)651-661
Number of pages11
JournalShōni shikagaku zasshi. The Japanese journal of pedodontics
Volume28
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1990

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