Effect of nicotine and ephedrine on the accumulation of 18F-FDG in brown adipose tissue

Shingo Baba, Mitsuaki Tatsumi, Takayoshi Ishimori, David L. Liliein, James M. Engles, Richard L. Wahl

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Abstract

This study evaluated the effect of various β-adrenergic agonists on 18F-FDG uptake in brown adipose tissue (BAT) in rats using ex vivo biodistribution studies. Methods: Caffeine (10 mg/kg of body weight, n = 4), ephedrine (5 mg/kg of body weight, n = 4), nicotine (0.8 mg/kg of body weight, n = 9), or a mixture of nicotine and ephedrine (0.8 mg/kg of body weight and 5 mg/kg of body weight, respectively, n = 9) was injected into the peritoneal cavity of female Lewis rats 30 min before intravenous 18F-FDG injection. One hour after injection of 18F-FDG, the animals were sacrificed, and BAT, other major organs, and blood were extracted. The biodistribution results were compared with body temperature data. Results: In the rats injected with nicotine or ephedrine, the mean uptake of 18F-FDG, in percentage injected dose (%ID)/(g of interscapular BAT) x (kg of body weight), was significantly increased (7.9-fold for nicotine and 3.7-fold for ephedrine), compared to the control rats. Nicotine had the strongest effect on 18F-FDG uptake in BAT. Caffeine increased BAT uptake slightly, but this increase did not reach statistical significance. The combination of nicotine and ephedrine increased the uptake 12.0-fold, compared with control rats; more than either nicotine or ephedrine alone. Uptake of 18F-FDG in most other major organs did not change significantly. The effect of nicotine was blocked by prior injection of β-adrenergic antagonists. A transient decrease in body temperature was observed in the nicotine-injected group, and this effect was canceled by prior injection of β-adrenergic antagonists. No significant change in baseline temperature was seen before or after β-adrenergic agonist injection. Conclusion: Nicotine caused a greater increase in 18F-FDG uptake in BAT than did other interventions, and the effect was increased when nicotine was combined with ephedrine. The effect of nicotine was completely blocked by prior injection of β-adrenergic antagonists, indicating that β-adrenergic agonists increase the metabolism of BAT. These preclinical data suggest that patients should avoid nicotine and ephedrine before undergoing 18F-FDG PET to minimize 18F-FDG uptake in BAT.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)981-986
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Nuclear Medicine
Volume48
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2007

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Ephedrine
Brown Adipose Tissue
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
Nicotine
Body Weight
Adrenergic Agonists
Injections
Adrenergic Antagonists
Caffeine
Body Temperature
Peritoneal Cavity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Effect of nicotine and ephedrine on the accumulation of 18F-FDG in brown adipose tissue. / Baba, Shingo; Tatsumi, Mitsuaki; Ishimori, Takayoshi; Liliein, David L.; Engles, James M.; Wahl, Richard L.

In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine, Vol. 48, No. 6, 01.06.2007, p. 981-986.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Baba, Shingo ; Tatsumi, Mitsuaki ; Ishimori, Takayoshi ; Liliein, David L. ; Engles, James M. ; Wahl, Richard L. / Effect of nicotine and ephedrine on the accumulation of 18F-FDG in brown adipose tissue. In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine. 2007 ; Vol. 48, No. 6. pp. 981-986.
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abstract = "This study evaluated the effect of various β-adrenergic agonists on 18F-FDG uptake in brown adipose tissue (BAT) in rats using ex vivo biodistribution studies. Methods: Caffeine (10 mg/kg of body weight, n = 4), ephedrine (5 mg/kg of body weight, n = 4), nicotine (0.8 mg/kg of body weight, n = 9), or a mixture of nicotine and ephedrine (0.8 mg/kg of body weight and 5 mg/kg of body weight, respectively, n = 9) was injected into the peritoneal cavity of female Lewis rats 30 min before intravenous 18F-FDG injection. One hour after injection of 18F-FDG, the animals were sacrificed, and BAT, other major organs, and blood were extracted. The biodistribution results were compared with body temperature data. Results: In the rats injected with nicotine or ephedrine, the mean uptake of 18F-FDG, in percentage injected dose ({\%}ID)/(g of interscapular BAT) x (kg of body weight), was significantly increased (7.9-fold for nicotine and 3.7-fold for ephedrine), compared to the control rats. Nicotine had the strongest effect on 18F-FDG uptake in BAT. Caffeine increased BAT uptake slightly, but this increase did not reach statistical significance. The combination of nicotine and ephedrine increased the uptake 12.0-fold, compared with control rats; more than either nicotine or ephedrine alone. Uptake of 18F-FDG in most other major organs did not change significantly. The effect of nicotine was blocked by prior injection of β-adrenergic antagonists. A transient decrease in body temperature was observed in the nicotine-injected group, and this effect was canceled by prior injection of β-adrenergic antagonists. No significant change in baseline temperature was seen before or after β-adrenergic agonist injection. Conclusion: Nicotine caused a greater increase in 18F-FDG uptake in BAT than did other interventions, and the effect was increased when nicotine was combined with ephedrine. The effect of nicotine was completely blocked by prior injection of β-adrenergic antagonists, indicating that β-adrenergic agonists increase the metabolism of BAT. These preclinical data suggest that patients should avoid nicotine and ephedrine before undergoing 18F-FDG PET to minimize 18F-FDG uptake in BAT.",
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AU - Baba, Shingo

AU - Tatsumi, Mitsuaki

AU - Ishimori, Takayoshi

AU - Liliein, David L.

AU - Engles, James M.

AU - Wahl, Richard L.

PY - 2007/6/1

Y1 - 2007/6/1

N2 - This study evaluated the effect of various β-adrenergic agonists on 18F-FDG uptake in brown adipose tissue (BAT) in rats using ex vivo biodistribution studies. Methods: Caffeine (10 mg/kg of body weight, n = 4), ephedrine (5 mg/kg of body weight, n = 4), nicotine (0.8 mg/kg of body weight, n = 9), or a mixture of nicotine and ephedrine (0.8 mg/kg of body weight and 5 mg/kg of body weight, respectively, n = 9) was injected into the peritoneal cavity of female Lewis rats 30 min before intravenous 18F-FDG injection. One hour after injection of 18F-FDG, the animals were sacrificed, and BAT, other major organs, and blood were extracted. The biodistribution results were compared with body temperature data. Results: In the rats injected with nicotine or ephedrine, the mean uptake of 18F-FDG, in percentage injected dose (%ID)/(g of interscapular BAT) x (kg of body weight), was significantly increased (7.9-fold for nicotine and 3.7-fold for ephedrine), compared to the control rats. Nicotine had the strongest effect on 18F-FDG uptake in BAT. Caffeine increased BAT uptake slightly, but this increase did not reach statistical significance. The combination of nicotine and ephedrine increased the uptake 12.0-fold, compared with control rats; more than either nicotine or ephedrine alone. Uptake of 18F-FDG in most other major organs did not change significantly. The effect of nicotine was blocked by prior injection of β-adrenergic antagonists. A transient decrease in body temperature was observed in the nicotine-injected group, and this effect was canceled by prior injection of β-adrenergic antagonists. No significant change in baseline temperature was seen before or after β-adrenergic agonist injection. Conclusion: Nicotine caused a greater increase in 18F-FDG uptake in BAT than did other interventions, and the effect was increased when nicotine was combined with ephedrine. The effect of nicotine was completely blocked by prior injection of β-adrenergic antagonists, indicating that β-adrenergic agonists increase the metabolism of BAT. These preclinical data suggest that patients should avoid nicotine and ephedrine before undergoing 18F-FDG PET to minimize 18F-FDG uptake in BAT.

AB - This study evaluated the effect of various β-adrenergic agonists on 18F-FDG uptake in brown adipose tissue (BAT) in rats using ex vivo biodistribution studies. Methods: Caffeine (10 mg/kg of body weight, n = 4), ephedrine (5 mg/kg of body weight, n = 4), nicotine (0.8 mg/kg of body weight, n = 9), or a mixture of nicotine and ephedrine (0.8 mg/kg of body weight and 5 mg/kg of body weight, respectively, n = 9) was injected into the peritoneal cavity of female Lewis rats 30 min before intravenous 18F-FDG injection. One hour after injection of 18F-FDG, the animals were sacrificed, and BAT, other major organs, and blood were extracted. The biodistribution results were compared with body temperature data. Results: In the rats injected with nicotine or ephedrine, the mean uptake of 18F-FDG, in percentage injected dose (%ID)/(g of interscapular BAT) x (kg of body weight), was significantly increased (7.9-fold for nicotine and 3.7-fold for ephedrine), compared to the control rats. Nicotine had the strongest effect on 18F-FDG uptake in BAT. Caffeine increased BAT uptake slightly, but this increase did not reach statistical significance. The combination of nicotine and ephedrine increased the uptake 12.0-fold, compared with control rats; more than either nicotine or ephedrine alone. Uptake of 18F-FDG in most other major organs did not change significantly. The effect of nicotine was blocked by prior injection of β-adrenergic antagonists. A transient decrease in body temperature was observed in the nicotine-injected group, and this effect was canceled by prior injection of β-adrenergic antagonists. No significant change in baseline temperature was seen before or after β-adrenergic agonist injection. Conclusion: Nicotine caused a greater increase in 18F-FDG uptake in BAT than did other interventions, and the effect was increased when nicotine was combined with ephedrine. The effect of nicotine was completely blocked by prior injection of β-adrenergic antagonists, indicating that β-adrenergic agonists increase the metabolism of BAT. These preclinical data suggest that patients should avoid nicotine and ephedrine before undergoing 18F-FDG PET to minimize 18F-FDG uptake in BAT.

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