Effect of steroid pulse therapy on post-transplant immunoglobulin A nephropathy

Yuta Matsukuma, Kosuke Masutani, Akihiro Tsuchimoto, Yasuhiro Okabe, Masafumi Nakamura, Takanari Kitazono, Kazuhiko Tsuruya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim: Recent studies have suggested that patients with post-transplant immunoglobulin A nephropathy have poor graft survival. There is limited research on the therapeutic effectiveness for post-transplant immunoglobulin A nephropathy, especially steroid pulse therapy. The present study evaluated the efficacy of steroid pulse therapy on post-transplant immunoglobulin A nephropathy. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed patients diagnosed with de novo or recurrent immunoglobulin A nephropathy at Kyushu University Hospital between January 2013 and August 2015. Patients with moderate proteinuria (≥0.5 g/g creatinine) and/or cellular or fibrocellular crescents on a graft biopsy were treated with steroid pulse therapy. Steroid pulse therapy was 500 mg/day for 3 days in weeks 1 and 2, followed by 20 mg of oral prednisolone that was tapered after 6 months. Patients were followed for 2 years, and the estimated glomerular filtration rate, urinary findings, and adverse events were recorded. Results: Seven patients received steroid pulse therapy. The mean duration after kidney transplantation was 6.6 ± 4.7 years. After 2 years of treatment, 85.7% of patients reached complete remission of proteinuria, urinary protein excretion declined (0.82 ± 0.51 to 0.26 ± 0.22 g/g creatinine, P = 0.007), and the estimated glomerular filtration rate was maintained (48.7 ± 12.8 to 47.4 ± 14.0 mL/min per 1.73 m2, P = 0.98). Adverse events were observed in one patient who developed herpes zoster infection. Conclusion: Steroid pulse therapy for post-transplant immunoglobulin A nephropathy effectively reduces proteinuria over 2 years. However, comparison of steroid pulse therapy and other regimens with a high-quality design is required.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)10-16
Number of pages7
JournalNephrology
Volume23
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2018

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IGA Glomerulonephritis
Steroids
Transplants
Proteinuria
Therapeutics
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Creatinine
Therapeutic Human Experimentation
Herpes Zoster
Graft Survival
Prednisolone
Kidney Transplantation
Biopsy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nephrology

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Effect of steroid pulse therapy on post-transplant immunoglobulin A nephropathy. / Matsukuma, Yuta; Masutani, Kosuke; Tsuchimoto, Akihiro; Okabe, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Masafumi; Kitazono, Takanari; Tsuruya, Kazuhiko.

In: Nephrology, Vol. 23, 07.2018, p. 10-16.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Masutani, Kosuke

AU - Tsuchimoto, Akihiro

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AU - Nakamura, Masafumi

AU - Kitazono, Takanari

AU - Tsuruya, Kazuhiko

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N2 - Aim: Recent studies have suggested that patients with post-transplant immunoglobulin A nephropathy have poor graft survival. There is limited research on the therapeutic effectiveness for post-transplant immunoglobulin A nephropathy, especially steroid pulse therapy. The present study evaluated the efficacy of steroid pulse therapy on post-transplant immunoglobulin A nephropathy. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed patients diagnosed with de novo or recurrent immunoglobulin A nephropathy at Kyushu University Hospital between January 2013 and August 2015. Patients with moderate proteinuria (≥0.5 g/g creatinine) and/or cellular or fibrocellular crescents on a graft biopsy were treated with steroid pulse therapy. Steroid pulse therapy was 500 mg/day for 3 days in weeks 1 and 2, followed by 20 mg of oral prednisolone that was tapered after 6 months. Patients were followed for 2 years, and the estimated glomerular filtration rate, urinary findings, and adverse events were recorded. Results: Seven patients received steroid pulse therapy. The mean duration after kidney transplantation was 6.6 ± 4.7 years. After 2 years of treatment, 85.7% of patients reached complete remission of proteinuria, urinary protein excretion declined (0.82 ± 0.51 to 0.26 ± 0.22 g/g creatinine, P = 0.007), and the estimated glomerular filtration rate was maintained (48.7 ± 12.8 to 47.4 ± 14.0 mL/min per 1.73 m2, P = 0.98). Adverse events were observed in one patient who developed herpes zoster infection. Conclusion: Steroid pulse therapy for post-transplant immunoglobulin A nephropathy effectively reduces proteinuria over 2 years. However, comparison of steroid pulse therapy and other regimens with a high-quality design is required.

AB - Aim: Recent studies have suggested that patients with post-transplant immunoglobulin A nephropathy have poor graft survival. There is limited research on the therapeutic effectiveness for post-transplant immunoglobulin A nephropathy, especially steroid pulse therapy. The present study evaluated the efficacy of steroid pulse therapy on post-transplant immunoglobulin A nephropathy. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed patients diagnosed with de novo or recurrent immunoglobulin A nephropathy at Kyushu University Hospital between January 2013 and August 2015. Patients with moderate proteinuria (≥0.5 g/g creatinine) and/or cellular or fibrocellular crescents on a graft biopsy were treated with steroid pulse therapy. Steroid pulse therapy was 500 mg/day for 3 days in weeks 1 and 2, followed by 20 mg of oral prednisolone that was tapered after 6 months. Patients were followed for 2 years, and the estimated glomerular filtration rate, urinary findings, and adverse events were recorded. Results: Seven patients received steroid pulse therapy. The mean duration after kidney transplantation was 6.6 ± 4.7 years. After 2 years of treatment, 85.7% of patients reached complete remission of proteinuria, urinary protein excretion declined (0.82 ± 0.51 to 0.26 ± 0.22 g/g creatinine, P = 0.007), and the estimated glomerular filtration rate was maintained (48.7 ± 12.8 to 47.4 ± 14.0 mL/min per 1.73 m2, P = 0.98). Adverse events were observed in one patient who developed herpes zoster infection. Conclusion: Steroid pulse therapy for post-transplant immunoglobulin A nephropathy effectively reduces proteinuria over 2 years. However, comparison of steroid pulse therapy and other regimens with a high-quality design is required.

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