Effect of Tibial Posterior Slope on Knee Kinematics, Quadriceps Force, and Patellofemoral Contact Force After Posterior-Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty

Shigetoshi Okamoto, Hideki Mizu-uchi, Ken Okazaki, Satoshi Hamai, Hiroyuki Nakahara, Yukihide Iwamoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We used a musculoskeletal model validated with in vivo data to evaluate the effect of tibial posterior slope on knee kinematics, quadriceps force, and patellofemoral contact force after posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty. The maximum quadriceps force and patellofemoral contact force decreased with increasing posterior slope. Anterior sliding of the tibial component and anterior impingement of the anterior aspect of the tibial post were observed with tibial posterior slopes of at least 5° and 10°, respectively. Increased tibial posterior slope contributes to improved exercise efficiency during knee extension, however excessive tibial posterior slope should be avoided to prevent knee instability. Based on our computer simulation we recommend tibial posterior slopes of less than 5° in posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1439-1443
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Arthroplasty
Volume30
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1 2015

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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