Effects of addition of glucose and sorbic acid on the fermentation quality of guineagrass (Panicum maximum Jacq.) silages

Tao Shao, Noriko Ohba, Masataka Shimojo, Yasuhisa Masuda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This experiment was carried out to study the effects of adding glucose or sorbic acid or both on the fermentation quality and residual mono-and disaccharides compositions of guineagrass silages. Guineagrass was treated with glucose (G) at the rates of 0, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0%, with or without sorbic acid (S) at the rate of 0.1% on the fresh weight basis. After thorough mixing, the grass material was ensiled into a laboratory silo (1 liter capacity) in triplicates and kept at the ambient temperature of 25°C, followed by being opened after 30 days of storage. Except for the silage with no addition, all silages were well preserved as judged from their low AN/TN (35.88-77.51 g/kg) and no or only detectable level of BA, VA and PA. Adding S alone showed a small decrease in pH value, however, a significant increase in LA content and significant decreases in AN/TN and VFAs content as compared with control. These suggested that S alone was effective in inhibiting the growth of clostridial and other aerobic bacteria, and decreased the protein degradation and the production of BA and VFAs, whereas increased LA content. However, the improvement was smaller than the other treatments (G or G with S), which was attributed to the low content of WSC in the original grass. All glucose addition silages (G or G with S) largely improved the fermentation qualities, as indicated by significantly lower pH (3.78-4.25), AN/TN (35.88-71.08 g/kg) and VFAs (9.00-28.99 g/kg), and the absence of BA, VA and PA, whereas significantly higher LA (24.47-52.53 g/kg) and LA/AA (1.06-5.89), when compared with control. Increasing the rate of glucose addition resulted in further decreases in pH, AN/TN and VFAs and further increases in LA and LA/AA. There were not significant differences in the fermentation qualities between 2%G and 1%G and between S+ 2%G and S + 1%G, respectively, except for a large decrease in AN/TN value and a slightly but significantly higher residual glucose and mono-and disaccharides when the G level was 2%. Similarly, there were not significant differences in the fermentation qualities between G alone and G with S, however, G with S addition tended to decrease AA content and tended to increase LA content and LA/AA. Moreover, S+ 2%G had slightly but significantly higher residual glucose and total mono-and disaccharides contents as well as significantly lower ethanol content compared with 2%G. These suggested that the S addition inhibited the aerobic bacterial growth and saved the fermentation substrates for LAB. From the present study, it was suggested that 1%G or S + 1%G addition was effective for improving the fermentation quality of guineagrass silage.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)351-358
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University
Volume47
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2003

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Sorbic Acid
Panicum
sorbic acid
Silage
Megathyrsus maximus
silage
Fermentation
fermentation
Glucose
glucose
Disaccharides
disaccharides
Poaceae
grasses
Aerobic Bacteria
Growth
protein degradation
Proteolysis
microbial growth
ambient temperature

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Agronomy and Crop Science

Cite this

Effects of addition of glucose and sorbic acid on the fermentation quality of guineagrass (Panicum maximum Jacq.) silages. / Shao, Tao; Ohba, Noriko; Shimojo, Masataka; Masuda, Yasuhisa.

In: Journal of the Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University, Vol. 47, No. 2, 01.02.2003, p. 351-358.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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