Effects of air exposure on hard and soft X-ray photoemission spectra of ultrananocrystalline diamond/amorphous carbon composite films

Mohamed Egiza, Hiroshi Naragino, Aki Tominaga, Kenji Hanada, Kazutaka Kamitani, Takeharu Sugiyama, Eiji Ikenaga, Koki Murasawa, Hidenobu Gonda, Masatoshi Sakurai, Tsuyoshi Yoshitake

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HAXPES) was employed for the structural evaluation of ultrananocrystalline diamond/amorphous carbon (UNCD/a-C) composite films deposited on cemented carbide substrates, at substrate temperatures up to 550 °C by coaxial arc plasma deposition. The results were compared with those of soft X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (SXPES). Since nanocrystalline diamond grains are easily destroyed by argon ion bombardment, the structural evaluation of UNCD/a-C films, without the argon ion bombardment, is preferable for precise evaluation. For samples that were preserved in a vacuum box after film preparation, the sp3 fraction estimated from HAXPES is in good agreement with that of SXPES. The substrate temperature dependencies also exhibited good correspondence with that of hardness and Young's modulus of the films. On the other hand, the sp3 fraction estimated from SXPES for samples that were not preserved in the vacuum box had an apparent deviation from those of HAXPES. Since it is possible for HAXPES to precisely estimate the sp3 fraction without the ion bombardment treatment, HAXPES is a feasible method for UNCD/a-C films, comprising nanocrystalline diamond grains.

Original languageEnglish
Article number359
JournalCoatings
Volume8
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surfaces and Interfaces
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Materials Chemistry

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