Effects of condensation and compressive strain on implant primary stability a longitudinal, in vivo, multiscale study in mice

Z. Li, M. Arioka, Y. Liu, M. Aghvami, S. Tulu, J. B. Brunski, J. A. Helms

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: Surgeons and most engineers believe that bone compaction improves implant primary stability without causing undue damage to the bone itself. In this study, we developed a murine distal femoral implant model and tested this dogma. Methods: Each mouse received two femoral implants, one placed into a site prepared by drilling and the other into the contralateral site prepared by drilling followed by stepwise condensation. Results: Condensation significantly increased peri-implant bone density but it also produced higher strains at the interface between the bone and implant, which led to significantly more bone microdamage. Despite increased peri-implant bone density, condensation did not improve implant primary stability as measured by an in vivo lateral stability test. Ultimately, the condensed bone underwent resorption, which delayed the onset of new bone formation around the implant. Conclusion: Collectively, these multiscale analyses demonstrate that condensation does not positively contribute to implant stability or to new peri-implant bone formation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)60-70
Number of pages11
JournalBone and Joint Research
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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