Effects of dilution by aromatic hydrocarbons on staged ignition behavior of n-decane droplets

O. Moriue, C. Eigenbrod, H. J. Rath, J. Sato, K. Okai, M. Tsue, M. Kono

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Spontaneous ignition of isolated two-component fuel droplets has been experimentally studied. The components were n-decane (ND)/1-methylnaphthalene (MN), or ND/1,2,4-trimethylbenzene (TMB). Both are n-alkane/aromatic mixtures, and therefore are candidates for model fuels of multicomponent commercial fuels refined from crude petroleum. ND showed two-stage ignition behavior, while the other two fuels (aromatic hydrocarbons) did not and were less reactive. A suspended droplet was suddenly brought to a high temperature for ignition. Observation by a Michelson interferometer detected cool-flame appearance as well as hot-flame appearance. The ambient gas was air, and the droplet diameter was 0.7 mm. The experimental conditions that were varied were ambient temperature, Ta, (500-1000 K), ambient pressure, Pa, (0.1-2.0 MPa), and the initial mole fraction of ND in the liquid phase, Z (0-1). In the case Z ≠ 1, Pa was fixed to 0.3 MPa. Ignition delays for cool-flame and hot-flame appearance (t1 and ttot) and the difference between them (t2) were measured, and ignition types (no ignition, cool-flame only, singlestage ignition, and two-stage ignition) were classified on a "Z-Ta" map. It is common to ND/MN and ND/TMB that two-stage ignition region is narrowed and finally vanishes as Z decreases, and that t1, t2, and ttot all increase monotonically as Z decreases. However, TMB was affected more than MN because of its higher volatility. (Normal boiling point: ND 447.3 K, MN 517.9 K, TMB 442.5 K) Numerical simulation with a fully transient one-dimensional model was employed to help the interpretation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)969-975
Number of pages7
JournalProceedings of the Combustion Institute
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2000
Event30th International Symposium on Combustion - Chicago, IL, United States
Duration: Jul 25 2004Jul 30 2004

Fingerprint

Aromatic Hydrocarbons
Aromatic hydrocarbons
ignition
Dilution
dilution
Ignition
hydrocarbons
flames
decane
Michelson interferometers
Alkanes
volatility
Boiling point
crude oil
boiling
Paraffins
alkanes
ambient temperature
liquid phases
Crude oil

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

Effects of dilution by aromatic hydrocarbons on staged ignition behavior of n-decane droplets. / Moriue, O.; Eigenbrod, C.; Rath, H. J.; Sato, J.; Okai, K.; Tsue, M.; Kono, M.

In: Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, Vol. 28, No. 1, 01.01.2000, p. 969-975.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Moriue, O. ; Eigenbrod, C. ; Rath, H. J. ; Sato, J. ; Okai, K. ; Tsue, M. ; Kono, M. / Effects of dilution by aromatic hydrocarbons on staged ignition behavior of n-decane droplets. In: Proceedings of the Combustion Institute. 2000 ; Vol. 28, No. 1. pp. 969-975.
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abstract = "Spontaneous ignition of isolated two-component fuel droplets has been experimentally studied. The components were n-decane (ND)/1-methylnaphthalene (MN), or ND/1,2,4-trimethylbenzene (TMB). Both are n-alkane/aromatic mixtures, and therefore are candidates for model fuels of multicomponent commercial fuels refined from crude petroleum. ND showed two-stage ignition behavior, while the other two fuels (aromatic hydrocarbons) did not and were less reactive. A suspended droplet was suddenly brought to a high temperature for ignition. Observation by a Michelson interferometer detected cool-flame appearance as well as hot-flame appearance. The ambient gas was air, and the droplet diameter was 0.7 mm. The experimental conditions that were varied were ambient temperature, Ta, (500-1000 K), ambient pressure, Pa, (0.1-2.0 MPa), and the initial mole fraction of ND in the liquid phase, Z (0-1). In the case Z ≠ 1, Pa was fixed to 0.3 MPa. Ignition delays for cool-flame and hot-flame appearance (t1 and ttot) and the difference between them (t2) were measured, and ignition types (no ignition, cool-flame only, singlestage ignition, and two-stage ignition) were classified on a {"}Z-Ta{"} map. It is common to ND/MN and ND/TMB that two-stage ignition region is narrowed and finally vanishes as Z decreases, and that t1, t2, and ttot all increase monotonically as Z decreases. However, TMB was affected more than MN because of its higher volatility. (Normal boiling point: ND 447.3 K, MN 517.9 K, TMB 442.5 K) Numerical simulation with a fully transient one-dimensional model was employed to help the interpretation.",
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AU - Moriue, O.

AU - Eigenbrod, C.

AU - Rath, H. J.

AU - Sato, J.

AU - Okai, K.

AU - Tsue, M.

AU - Kono, M.

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