Effects of Intravitreal Administration of Steroids on Experimental Subretinal Neovascularization in the Subhuman Primate

Tatsuro Ishibashi, Koichiro Miki, Randi Patterson, Stephen J. Ryan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

178 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To elucidate the role of inflammation in the occurrence of experimental subretinal neovascularization caused by highintensity laser photocoagulation, we investigated the effects of vitreal infusion of steroids on laser lesions in a primate model. Dexamethasone, with or without triamcinolone, was infused continuously for two weeks through an indwelling cannula system. The animals were followed up clinically for up to eight weeks. The frequency of subretinal neovascularization in the steroid-treated animals was significantly lower than that in a control group of untreated animals. Although steroids have multiple effects, these results suggest that the inflammatory response, possibly macrophage infiltration, may plan an important role in the occurrence of subretinal neovascularization in our experimental model.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)708-711
Number of pages4
JournalArchives of Ophthalmology
Volume103
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 1985
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Primates
Steroids
Lasers
Triamcinolone
Light Coagulation
Dexamethasone
Theoretical Models
Macrophages
Inflammation
Control Groups
Cannula

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Effects of Intravitreal Administration of Steroids on Experimental Subretinal Neovascularization in the Subhuman Primate. / Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Miki, Koichiro; Patterson, Randi; Ryan, Stephen J.

In: Archives of Ophthalmology, Vol. 103, No. 5, 01.01.1985, p. 708-711.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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