EFFECTS OF LONG-TIME COMMUTING AND LONG-HOUR WORKING ON LIFESTYLE AND MENTAL HEALTH AMONG SCHOOL TEACHERS IN TOKYO, JAPAN

Marino Nomoto, Akiko Hara, Kimiyo Kikuchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of long-time commuting and long-hour working on lifestyle including sleeping, physical exercise, breakfast, smoking, alcohol intake and mental health. In this cross-sectional study, data were collected from 146 school teachers in Tokyo. The binary associations of commuting time and working hours with lifestyle, mental stress measured by the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) and stress coping measured by the Sense of Coherence (SOC) scores were examined. The Chi-square test was used for statistical analyses. Our results indicated that the mean commuting time and working hours per week of the respondents were 42.1 (SD 22.5) minutes and 50.4 (SD 8.6) hours, respectively. Longer commuting time was significantly associated with shorter working hours (p = 0.023), less physical exercise (p < 0.001) and shorter sleeping hours (p = 0.001). Longer working hours were significantly associated with more frequent working on holidays (p = 0.001), higher SOC scores (p = 0.001) and more smoking (p = 0.028). The negative association between GHQ and SOC scores was also significant (p < 0.001). Our findings revealed that long-time commuters were more likely to sleep less, exercise less and work less long. Long-hour workers were more likely to commute shorter, work on holidays more frequently, smoke more and their stress coping potentials were higher. Some kinds of strategies are required to improve the healthy lifestyle for long-time com- muters or long-hour workers. Key words: stress; stress coping; general health questionnaire; sense of coherence

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Human Ergology
Volume44
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Tokyo
Sense of Coherence
Life Style
Mental Health
Japan
Holidays
Exercise
Health
Smoking
Breakfast
Chi-Square Distribution
Smoke
School Teachers
Sleep
Cross-Sectional Studies
Alcohols
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

EFFECTS OF LONG-TIME COMMUTING AND LONG-HOUR WORKING ON LIFESTYLE AND MENTAL HEALTH AMONG SCHOOL TEACHERS IN TOKYO, JAPAN. / Nomoto, Marino; Hara, Akiko; Kikuchi, Kimiyo.

In: Journal of Human Ergology, Vol. 44, No. 1, 01.06.2015, p. 1-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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