Effects of sediment released from a check dam on sediment deposits and fish and macroinvertebrate communities in a small stream

Rei Itsukushima, Kazuaki Ohtsuki, Tatsuro Sato, Yuichi Kano, Hiroshi Takata, Hiroaki Yoshikawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dam removal is typically intended for river restoration or as a countermeasure for aging dams. The influence of dam removal has mainly been studied in large rivers. This study is intended to investigate the influence of the sediment supplied after opening a check dam drain in a small steep stream to contribute to the establishment of sediment release technology form check dam by accumulating the basic knowledge about the influence of sediment release. Deposited sediment in the impoundment was rapidly discharged immediately after opening the drain outlet, and a moderate sediment discharge followed. The water course of the sediments deposited by repeated channel widening and riverbed degradation tended to stop longitudinal topographic changes from downstream. In addition, the turbidity during a flood was high in the first year and tended to decrease in the second year. As for the ecosystem response, changes in the benthic macroinvertebrate community were confirmed in downstream sites, and net-spinning species especially deceased immediately after the sediment supply began. Our monitoring results suggest that the increasing turbidity was suppressed during the flood because sediment release was conducted from the small-scale facility. As a result, a negative impact on the aquatic ecosystem seemed to be reduced.

Original languageEnglish
Article number716
JournalWater (Switzerland)
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2019

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Aquatic Science
  • Water Science and Technology

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