Effects of self-explanation as a metacognitive strategy for solving mathematical word problems 1

Hidetsugu Tajika, Narao Nakatsu, Hironari Nozaki, Ewald Neumann, Shun-Ichi Maruno

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined how a metacognitive strategy known as self-explanation influences word problem solving in elementary school children. Participants were 79 sixth-graders. They were assigned to one of three groups: the self-explanation group, the self-learning group, or the control group. Students in each group performed a ratio word problem test and a transfer test. The results showed that students in the self-explanation group outperformed students in the other two groups on both the ratio word problem test and on the transfer test. In addition, high explainers who generated more self-explanations relating to deep understanding of worked-out examples outperformed low explainers on both ratio word problem and transfer tests. The self-explanation effect is discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)222-233
Number of pages12
JournalJapanese Psychological Research
Volume49
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2007

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Students
Learning
Control Groups
Transfer (Psychology)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)

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Effects of self-explanation as a metacognitive strategy for solving mathematical word problems 1. / Tajika, Hidetsugu; Nakatsu, Narao; Nozaki, Hironari; Neumann, Ewald; Maruno, Shun-Ichi.

In: Japanese Psychological Research, Vol. 49, No. 3, 01.09.2007, p. 222-233.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tajika, Hidetsugu ; Nakatsu, Narao ; Nozaki, Hironari ; Neumann, Ewald ; Maruno, Shun-Ichi. / Effects of self-explanation as a metacognitive strategy for solving mathematical word problems 1. In: Japanese Psychological Research. 2007 ; Vol. 49, No. 3. pp. 222-233.
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