Effects of soil organic matter on ph-dependent phosphate sorption by soils

Syuntaro Hiradate, Natsuyo Uchida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Effects of soil organic matter (80M) on P sorption of soils still remain to be clarified because contradictory results have been reported in the literature. In the present study, pH-dependent P sorption on an allophanic Andisol and an alluvial soil was compared with that on hydrogen peroxide (H202)-treated, acid-oxalate (OX)-treated, and dithionite-citrate- bicarbonate (DCB)-treated soils. Removal of 80M increased or decreased P sorption depending on the equilibrium pH values and soil types. In the H2O2 OX-, and DCB-treated soils, P sorption was pH-dependent, but this trend was not conspicuous in the untreated soils. It is likely that 80M affects P sorption of soils through three factors, competitive sorption, inhibition of polymerization and crystallization of metals such as AI and Fe, and flexible structure of metal-80M complexes. As a result, the number of available sites for P sorption would remain relatively constant in the wide range of equilibrium pH values in the presence of 80M. The P sorption characteristics were analyzed at constant equilibrium pH values (4.0 to 7.0) using the Langmuir equation as a local isotherm. The maximum number of available sites for P sorption (Qmax) was pH-dependent in the H202-, OX-, and DCBtreated soils, while this trend was not conspicuous in the untreated soils. Affinity constants related to binding strength (K) were less affected by the equilibrium pH values, soil types, and soil treatments, and were almost constant (log K ≈ 4.5). These findings support the hypothesis that 80M plays a role in keeping the number of available sites for P sorption relatively constant but does not affect the P sorption affinity. By estimating the Qmax and K values as a function of equilibrium pH values, pH-dependent P sorption was well simulated with four or two adjustable parameters. This empirical model could be useful and convenient for a rough estimation of the pH-dependent P sorption of soils.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)665-675
Number of pages11
JournalSoil Science and Plant Nutrition
Volume50
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

sorption
soil organic matter
phosphate
phosphates
soil
oxalates
oxalate
bicarbonates
bicarbonate
citrates
effect
soil type
soil types
metals
Andisol
Andisols
alluvial soils
metal
crystallization
soil treatment

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Soil Science
  • Plant Science

Cite this

Effects of soil organic matter on ph-dependent phosphate sorption by soils. / Hiradate, Syuntaro; Uchida, Natsuyo.

In: Soil Science and Plant Nutrition, Vol. 50, No. 5, 01.02.2004, p. 665-675.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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