Effects of superparasitism, larval competition, and host feeding on offspring fitness in the parasitoid Pimpla nipponica (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

When females of Pimpla nipponica Uchida, a solitary parasitoid of various lepidopterous pupae, were exposed to hosts for varing periods of time, percentage wasp emergence decreased; the percentage immature wasps dying at the egg or early-instar stages increased with increasing exposure periods. Factors influencing the increased wasp mortality were examined. Larval competition occurred between 24 and 48 h after parasitism when 1st instars fought physically with their mandibles. Also, many parasitoid eggs had melanized wounds, developed abnormally and died, indicating that 1st instars attacked and killed conspecific eggs. Superparasitism did not influence the fitness of emerging wasps. Hosts used for host feeding by female wasps yielded fewer and smaller wasps. Thus, host feeding was the major factor influencing offspring survival and fitness when multiple attacks against a single host occurred. Superparasitism, larval competition, and host feeding in solitary parasitoids are discussed in the context of adaptive superparasitism theories and mass-rearing programs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)682-688
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of the Entomological Society of America
Volume90
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1997

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Insect Science

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Effects of superparasitism, larval competition, and host feeding on offspring fitness in the parasitoid Pimpla nipponica (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this