Effects of the direction and distance of horizontal arm movements on local muscular strain--a fundamental study on the teller workplace in bank.

A. Yasukouchi, K. Arai, J. Ohashi, H. Sako, K. Kato

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study was conducted to examine the relative differences in the muscular strain of the hand-arm-shoulder system in the repetitive arm movements which would directly depend on the layout of devices at teller counter. The subjects were five young male adults. The manual handling task was standardized and the repetition frequency was in self-pace. The arm movements were characterized by the different direction measured from the frontal plane of the subject between 0 degrees to 150 degrees combined with the distance measured from the acromion to the fixed points of 300, 500 and 700mm. The movements to all of the fourteen points tested were evaluated on both sides of the arms and shoulders by the integration of the EMG signals (IEMG) as to m. deltoid pars media and clavicularis, m. trapezius pars descendens, m. pectoralis major pars clavicularis and m. extensor carpi radialis brevis. It was found that IEMG of the deltoid muscles were sensitive to the direction and distance of the arm movements while the trapezius muscle showed the relative lower dependence on the direction. There were significant combined effects of the direction and distance in all muscles; i.e. effect of reach distance was greater with decreasing the arm angle, which was obvious at distance longer than 500mm in the arm abduction. When IEMG was divided by the task time in self-pace which increased in the arm abduction, the peak value was observed at the angle of 30 degrees. It was suggested that if the repetitive movement was required at the same frequency as at the angle of 30 degrees the position near the arm abduction (the angle of 0 degrees) would become the most expensive working direction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)341-350
Number of pages10
JournalThe Annals of physiological anthropology = Seiri Jinruigaku Kenkyūkai kaishi
Volume12
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1993

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abduction
Workplace
Muscle
bank
Arm
workplace
layout
Superficial Back Muscles
Acromion
Deltoid Muscle
Direction compound
Values
Young Adult
Hand
Equipment and Supplies
Muscles

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anatomy

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Effects of the direction and distance of horizontal arm movements on local muscular strain--a fundamental study on the teller workplace in bank. / Yasukouchi, A.; Arai, K.; Ohashi, J.; Sako, H.; Kato, K.

In: The Annals of physiological anthropology = Seiri Jinruigaku Kenkyūkai kaishi, Vol. 12, No. 6, 11.1993, p. 341-350.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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