Effects of upper limb exercise on thermoregulatory responses in patients with spinal cord injury.

K. Ishii, M. Yamasaki, Satoshi Muraki, T. Komura, K. Kikuchi, T. Satake, T. Miyagawa, S. Fujimoto, K. Maeda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We evaluated changes in body temperature, heart rate, and oxygen uptake during arm cranking exercise (20 watts, 30 min) in an artificial climate room at a temperature of about 25 degrees C or 35 degrees C (relative humidity, about 50%) in 5 patients with paraplegics due to spinal cord injury (SCI). The tympanic temperature (Tty) was significantly higher from rest to recovery at 35 degrees C than at 25 degrees C. The mean Tty after 10 minutes of rest was 36.68 degrees C +/- 0.396 (mean +/- SD) at a room temperature of 25 degrees C and 37.25 degrees C +/- 0.253 at 35 degrees C, showing a difference of about 0.5 degrees C. This difference was maintained during exercise and recovery. The Tty at the end of exercise was higher than that at the start of exercise by 0.66 degrees C +/- 0.218 (mean +/- SD) at 25 degrees C and by 0.59 degrees C +/- 0.210 at 35 degrees C. The skin temperature (Tsk) in each measurement area (the head, arm, chest, thigh, shin, and calf) was significantly higher at 35 degrees C. Oxygen uptake did not differ between 25 degrees C and 35 degrees C. The heart rate was significantly higher at 35 degrees C than at 25 degrees C during rest and at the start of exercise but did not differ during exercise and recovery. Thus, mild-moderate exercise in this study did not cause marked changes such as increases in body temperature and heart rate that affect biological function in SCI.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)149-154
Number of pages6
JournalApplied human science : journal of physiological anthropology
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 1995
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

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