Elongation flow studies of DNA as a function of temperature

N. Sasaki, Y. Maki, M. Nakata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The response of T4-phage DNA molecules to an elongational flow field was monitored by flow-induced birefringence as a function of temperature. The flow-induced birefringence observed in this study was localized in the pure elongational flow area with a critical strain rate, indicating that the birefringence was attributed to a coil-stretch transition of DNA molecules. The slight decrease in the birefringence intensity with increases in temperature to 40°C was explained by a thermal-activation process. At temperatures above 50°C, flow-induced birefringence decreased remarkably, and no birefringence was observed at temperatures above 60°C. After the flow experiments, ambient temperature was reduced back to room temperature, and flow experiments at room temperature were performed again. Flow-induced birefringence was recovered almost completely in samples for which the first flow measurements were made at temperatures below 53°C. Irreversible changes were observed for samples for which the first flow experiments were performed at temperatures above 55°C. The temperature dependence of UV-absorption spectra revealed that the double-strand DNA helix began to partially untwine at a temperature over 50°C, and duplexes became almost completely untwined at a temperature over 55°C. A comparison of electrophoresis patterns for untwined molecules showed that flow-induced scission of DNA molecules occurred in a sample solution in flow experiments performed at 65°C, while no molecular weight reduction was observed in the sample solution at 55°C. In this article, this difference between the untwined DNA molecules is discussed on the basis of the thermally activated bond scission (TABS) model.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1357-1365
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Applied Polymer Science
Volume83
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 7 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Elongation
DNA
Birefringence
Temperature
Molecules
Experiments
Bacteriophages
Flow measurement
Electrophoresis
Strain rate
Absorption spectra
Flow fields
Chemical activation
Molecular weight

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Polymers and Plastics
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

Elongation flow studies of DNA as a function of temperature. / Sasaki, N.; Maki, Y.; Nakata, M.

In: Journal of Applied Polymer Science, Vol. 83, No. 6, 07.02.2002, p. 1357-1365.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sasaki, N. ; Maki, Y. ; Nakata, M. / Elongation flow studies of DNA as a function of temperature. In: Journal of Applied Polymer Science. 2002 ; Vol. 83, No. 6. pp. 1357-1365.
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