Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for esophageal varices associated with concomintant portal venous thrombus of hepatocellular carcinoma

Masayuki Ohta, Makoto Hashizume, Morimasa Tomikawa, Tatsuro Kamakura, Kouhei Akazawa, Kiichiro Ueno, Hirohiko Yamaga, Seigo Kitano, Kazuo Tanoue, Takashi Matsumata, Keizo Sugimachi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Between 1983 and 1994, we treated 51 patients with esophageal varices and portal trunk and main branch invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma, using endoscopic injection sclerotherapy. Variceal bleeding was controlled in 28 of 29 patients (96.6%), esophageal varices were completely eradicated in 28 (54.9%), and only 2 of 28 (7.1%) bled from small, dilated, venous vessels after eradication. The cumulative nonbleeding rate at 3 years was 87.5%. Death caused by hepatocellular carcinoma accounted for 89.4% of the patients, whereas the rate of bleeding from esophageal varices was 4.3%. Variables significantly associated with the duration of survival were Okuda's clinical stage, alpha‐fetoprotein, eradication of esophageal varices by sclerotherapy, and treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma, as determined in a univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis showed that eradication of esophageal varices by sclerotherapy, Okuda's clinical stage, and age were independent factors which significantly influenced survival time. We propose that complete eradication of esophageal varices and close follow‐up using endoscopy may lead to a reduction in bleeding from esophageal varices, and hence may reduce mortality rates related to this bleeding.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)125-130
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Surgical Oncology
Volume59
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 1995

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Sclerotherapy
Esophageal and Gastric Varices
Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Thrombosis
Injections
Hemorrhage
Survival
Endoscopy
Multivariate Analysis
Mortality

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Oncology

Cite this

Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for esophageal varices associated with concomintant portal venous thrombus of hepatocellular carcinoma. / Ohta, Masayuki; Hashizume, Makoto; Tomikawa, Morimasa; Kamakura, Tatsuro; Akazawa, Kouhei; Ueno, Kiichiro; Yamaga, Hirohiko; Kitano, Seigo; Tanoue, Kazuo; Matsumata, Takashi; Sugimachi, Keizo.

In: Journal of Surgical Oncology, Vol. 59, No. 2, 01.01.1995, p. 125-130.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ohta, M, Hashizume, M, Tomikawa, M, Kamakura, T, Akazawa, K, Ueno, K, Yamaga, H, Kitano, S, Tanoue, K, Matsumata, T & Sugimachi, K 1995, 'Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for esophageal varices associated with concomintant portal venous thrombus of hepatocellular carcinoma', Journal of Surgical Oncology, vol. 59, no. 2, pp. 125-130. https://doi.org/10.1002/jso.2930590210
Ohta, Masayuki ; Hashizume, Makoto ; Tomikawa, Morimasa ; Kamakura, Tatsuro ; Akazawa, Kouhei ; Ueno, Kiichiro ; Yamaga, Hirohiko ; Kitano, Seigo ; Tanoue, Kazuo ; Matsumata, Takashi ; Sugimachi, Keizo. / Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for esophageal varices associated with concomintant portal venous thrombus of hepatocellular carcinoma. In: Journal of Surgical Oncology. 1995 ; Vol. 59, No. 2. pp. 125-130.
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