Epigallocatechin-3-gallate, a green-tea polyphenol, suppresses Rho signaling in TWNT-4 human hepatic stellate cells

Nobuhiko Higashi, Motoyuki Kohjima, Marie Fukushima, Satoshi Ohta, Kazuhiro Kotoh, Munechika Enjoji, Naoya Kobayashi, Makoto Nakamuta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major constituent of the polyphenoids in green tea, has been reported to possess a wide range of biologic activities, including antifibrogenesis. Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are central to hepatic fibrosis, and Rho (a small GTPase)-signaling pathways have been implicated in the activation and proliferation of HSCs. In this study, we investigated the effect of EGCG on Rho-signaling pathways in activated human HSC-derived TWNT-4 cells. EGCG inhibited stress-fiber formation, an indicator of Rho activation, and changed the distribution of α-smooth-muscle actin. These inhibitory effects of EGCG were restored by overexpression of constitutively active Rho. A pull-down assay revealed that activated Rho (GTP-bound state) was strongly inhibited by ECGC and accompanied by suppressed phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase, which is a regulator of Rho-signaling pathways. 5-Bromo-2′-deoxy-uridine incorporation demonstrated that ECGC (100 μmol/L suppressed cell growth by 80%, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase viotin-deoxyruidine triphosphate nick end-labeling revealed that EGCG (100 μmol/L) caused apoptosis in half of the total cells. EGCG also strongly inhibited lysophoaphatidic acid (an activator of Rho) and induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (Erk1/2, c-jun kinase, and p38). These findings demonstrate that EGCG regulates the structure and growth of HSCs by way of Rho-signaling pathways and suggest that EGCG has therapeutic potential in the setting of liver fibrosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)316-322
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine
Volume145
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2005

Fingerprint

Hepatic Stellate Cells
Polyphenols
Tea
Phosphorylation
Chemical activation
Focal Adhesion Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
Stress Fibers
Monomeric GTP-Binding Proteins
DNA Nucleotidylexotransferase
epigallocatechin gallate
Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1
Cell growth
Bromodeoxyuridine
Growth
Guanosine Triphosphate
Liver Cirrhosis
Liver
Labeling
Smooth Muscle
Muscle

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Epigallocatechin-3-gallate, a green-tea polyphenol, suppresses Rho signaling in TWNT-4 human hepatic stellate cells. / Higashi, Nobuhiko; Kohjima, Motoyuki; Fukushima, Marie; Ohta, Satoshi; Kotoh, Kazuhiro; Enjoji, Munechika; Kobayashi, Naoya; Nakamuta, Makoto.

In: Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine, Vol. 145, No. 6, 01.06.2005, p. 316-322.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Higashi, Nobuhiko ; Kohjima, Motoyuki ; Fukushima, Marie ; Ohta, Satoshi ; Kotoh, Kazuhiro ; Enjoji, Munechika ; Kobayashi, Naoya ; Nakamuta, Makoto. / Epigallocatechin-3-gallate, a green-tea polyphenol, suppresses Rho signaling in TWNT-4 human hepatic stellate cells. In: Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine. 2005 ; Vol. 145, No. 6. pp. 316-322.
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AU - Ohta, Satoshi

AU - Kotoh, Kazuhiro

AU - Enjoji, Munechika

AU - Kobayashi, Naoya

AU - Nakamuta, Makoto

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AB - Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major constituent of the polyphenoids in green tea, has been reported to possess a wide range of biologic activities, including antifibrogenesis. Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are central to hepatic fibrosis, and Rho (a small GTPase)-signaling pathways have been implicated in the activation and proliferation of HSCs. In this study, we investigated the effect of EGCG on Rho-signaling pathways in activated human HSC-derived TWNT-4 cells. EGCG inhibited stress-fiber formation, an indicator of Rho activation, and changed the distribution of α-smooth-muscle actin. These inhibitory effects of EGCG were restored by overexpression of constitutively active Rho. A pull-down assay revealed that activated Rho (GTP-bound state) was strongly inhibited by ECGC and accompanied by suppressed phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase, which is a regulator of Rho-signaling pathways. 5-Bromo-2′-deoxy-uridine incorporation demonstrated that ECGC (100 μmol/L suppressed cell growth by 80%, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase viotin-deoxyruidine triphosphate nick end-labeling revealed that EGCG (100 μmol/L) caused apoptosis in half of the total cells. EGCG also strongly inhibited lysophoaphatidic acid (an activator of Rho) and induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (Erk1/2, c-jun kinase, and p38). These findings demonstrate that EGCG regulates the structure and growth of HSCs by way of Rho-signaling pathways and suggest that EGCG has therapeutic potential in the setting of liver fibrosis.

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