Epithelial-mesenchymal transition abolishes the susceptibility of polarized epithelial cell lines to measles virus

Yuta Shirogane, Makoto Takeda, Maino Tahara, Satoshi Ikegame, Takanori Nakamura, Yusuke Yanagi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Measles virus (MV), an enveloped negative-strand RNA virus, remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. MV predominantly infects immune cells by using signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM; also called CD150) as a receptor, but it also infects polarized epithelial cells, forming tight junctions in a SLAM-independent manner. Although the ability of MV to infect polarized epithelial cells is thought to be important for its transmission, the epithelial cell receptor for MV has not been identified. A transcriptional repressor, Snail, induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), in which epithelial cells lose epithelial cell phenotypes, such as adherens and tight junctions. In this study, EMTwas induced by expressing Snail in a lung adenocarcinoma cell line, II-18, which is highly susceptible to wild-type MV. Snail-expressing II-18 cells lost adherens and tight junctions. Microarray analysis confirmed the induction of EMT in II-18 cells and suggested a novel function of Snail in protein degradation and distribution. Importantly, wild-type MV no longer entered EMT-induced II-18 cells, suggesting that the epithelial cell receptor is down-regulated by the induction of EMT. Other polarized cell lines, NCI-H358 and HT-29, also lost susceptibility to wild-type MV when EMT was induced. However, the complete formation of tight junctions rather reduced MV entry into HT-29 cells. Taken together, these data suggest that the unidentified epithelial cell receptor forMVis involved in the formation of epithelial intercellular junctions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)20882-20890
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume285
Issue number27
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2 2010

Fingerprint

Measles virus
Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition
Viruses
Epithelial Cells
Cell Line
Tight Junctions
Adherens Junctions
Cells
Virus Internalization
HT29 Cells
Intercellular Junctions
RNA Viruses
Microarray Analysis
Lymphocytes
Lymphocyte Activation
Microarrays
Developing Countries
Proteolysis
Developing countries
Morbidity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Epithelial-mesenchymal transition abolishes the susceptibility of polarized epithelial cell lines to measles virus. / Shirogane, Yuta; Takeda, Makoto; Tahara, Maino; Ikegame, Satoshi; Nakamura, Takanori; Yanagi, Yusuke.

In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 285, No. 27, 02.07.2010, p. 20882-20890.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shirogane, Yuta ; Takeda, Makoto ; Tahara, Maino ; Ikegame, Satoshi ; Nakamura, Takanori ; Yanagi, Yusuke. / Epithelial-mesenchymal transition abolishes the susceptibility of polarized epithelial cell lines to measles virus. In: Journal of Biological Chemistry. 2010 ; Vol. 285, No. 27. pp. 20882-20890.
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