Esophageal atresia with long gap

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The definition of "long gap" is generally more than two vertebrae. At first, the gap of the esophagus is tried to be shortened using some devices for extension of both the upper and lower esophagus. Foker' s method is reported to be effective. There are several options using alternative organs, such as gastric tube, jejunal interposition, colonic transposition, and gastric transposition. Gastric transposition is one of the alternatives for replacing the esophagus using the whole stomach. This procedure can be performed trans-hiatally via the posterior mediastinum without thoracotomy. There have been several reports showing good results compared with other procedures. This method has the advantage of involving only one anastomosis, which is well vascularized and is associated with a low incidence of leakage. Briefly, the greater curvature of the stomach is mobilized by ligating and dividing the vessels in the greater omentum and the short gastric vessels. These vessels should be ligated well away from the stomach wall in order to preserve the vascular arcades of the right gastroepiploic vessels. The highest part of the fundus of the stomach is identified and pulled up through the posterior mediastinum into the neck.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationOperative General Surgery in Neonates and Infants
PublisherSpringer Japan
Pages101-109
Number of pages9
ISBN (Electronic)9784431558767
ISBN (Print)9784431558743
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 23 2016

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Esophageal Atresia
Stomach
Esophagus
Mediastinum
Omentum
Thoracotomy
Blood Vessels
Spine
Neck
Equipment and Supplies
Incidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Taguchi, T. (2016). Esophageal atresia with long gap. In Operative General Surgery in Neonates and Infants (pp. 101-109). Springer Japan. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-4-431-55876-7_16

Esophageal atresia with long gap. / Taguchi, Tomoaki.

Operative General Surgery in Neonates and Infants. Springer Japan, 2016. p. 101-109.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Taguchi, T 2016, Esophageal atresia with long gap. in Operative General Surgery in Neonates and Infants. Springer Japan, pp. 101-109. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-4-431-55876-7_16
Taguchi T. Esophageal atresia with long gap. In Operative General Surgery in Neonates and Infants. Springer Japan. 2016. p. 101-109 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-4-431-55876-7_16
Taguchi, Tomoaki. / Esophageal atresia with long gap. Operative General Surgery in Neonates and Infants. Springer Japan, 2016. pp. 101-109
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