Evaluations of epithelial sealing and peri-implant epithelial down-growth around "step-type" implants

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Abstract

Objective: Implant designs that can stimulate and integrate with an epithelial wound-healing process may significantly enhance the efficacy of dental implants. Here, we evaluated the potential of "step-type" implant systems to improve the sealing between the peri-implant epithelium (PIE) and the implant surface, and investigated the effect of implant structure on PIE down-growth. Materials and methods: Right maxillary first molars were extirpated from rats and implanted with either a straight-type or a step-type implant varying in step height and/or width (N s: 0.8mm height, 0.1mm width; W s: 0.8mm height, 0.2mm width; H s: 0.4mm height, 0.1mm width). Maxillae were harvested at various time points over 16 weeks to evaluate laminin-5 distribution as an indicator of wound healing and PIE formation, horse-radish peroxidase (HRP) penetration as a measurement of epithelial sealing, and PIE down-growth formation. Results: In all implant models, the PIE formed from the oral sulcular epithelium and spread apically along the implant surface. In the W s group, HRP penetration was detected only in the coronal region of the PIE at 4 weeks, whereas in the straight-type, it was observed in the apical region and the connective tissue. At 16 weeks, the W s implants exhibited markedly less PIE down-growth than the Con, N s or H s implants, and were equivalent to that observed in natural teeth. Conclusion: The step-type implant system may have the potential for improving epithelial sealing at the tissue-implant interface, as well as reducing apical PIE down-growth, thus enhancing dental implant efficacy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)459-466
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Oral Implants Research
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2012

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Epithelium
Growth
Raphanus
Dental Implants
Wound Healing
Peroxidase
Horses
Maxilla
Connective Tissue
Tooth

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oral Surgery

Cite this

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title = "Evaluations of epithelial sealing and peri-implant epithelial down-growth around {"}step-type{"} implants",
abstract = "Objective: Implant designs that can stimulate and integrate with an epithelial wound-healing process may significantly enhance the efficacy of dental implants. Here, we evaluated the potential of {"}step-type{"} implant systems to improve the sealing between the peri-implant epithelium (PIE) and the implant surface, and investigated the effect of implant structure on PIE down-growth. Materials and methods: Right maxillary first molars were extirpated from rats and implanted with either a straight-type or a step-type implant varying in step height and/or width (N s: 0.8mm height, 0.1mm width; W s: 0.8mm height, 0.2mm width; H s: 0.4mm height, 0.1mm width). Maxillae were harvested at various time points over 16 weeks to evaluate laminin-5 distribution as an indicator of wound healing and PIE formation, horse-radish peroxidase (HRP) penetration as a measurement of epithelial sealing, and PIE down-growth formation. Results: In all implant models, the PIE formed from the oral sulcular epithelium and spread apically along the implant surface. In the W s group, HRP penetration was detected only in the coronal region of the PIE at 4 weeks, whereas in the straight-type, it was observed in the apical region and the connective tissue. At 16 weeks, the W s implants exhibited markedly less PIE down-growth than the Con, N s or H s implants, and were equivalent to that observed in natural teeth. Conclusion: The step-type implant system may have the potential for improving epithelial sealing at the tissue-implant interface, as well as reducing apical PIE down-growth, thus enhancing dental implant efficacy.",
author = "Atsuta Ikiru and Yasunori Ayukawa and Yoichiro Ogino and Yasuko Moriyama and Yohei Jinno and Kiyoshi Koyano",
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T1 - Evaluations of epithelial sealing and peri-implant epithelial down-growth around "step-type" implants

AU - Ikiru, Atsuta

AU - Ayukawa, Yasunori

AU - Ogino, Yoichiro

AU - Moriyama, Yasuko

AU - Jinno, Yohei

AU - Koyano, Kiyoshi

PY - 2012/4/1

Y1 - 2012/4/1

N2 - Objective: Implant designs that can stimulate and integrate with an epithelial wound-healing process may significantly enhance the efficacy of dental implants. Here, we evaluated the potential of "step-type" implant systems to improve the sealing between the peri-implant epithelium (PIE) and the implant surface, and investigated the effect of implant structure on PIE down-growth. Materials and methods: Right maxillary first molars were extirpated from rats and implanted with either a straight-type or a step-type implant varying in step height and/or width (N s: 0.8mm height, 0.1mm width; W s: 0.8mm height, 0.2mm width; H s: 0.4mm height, 0.1mm width). Maxillae were harvested at various time points over 16 weeks to evaluate laminin-5 distribution as an indicator of wound healing and PIE formation, horse-radish peroxidase (HRP) penetration as a measurement of epithelial sealing, and PIE down-growth formation. Results: In all implant models, the PIE formed from the oral sulcular epithelium and spread apically along the implant surface. In the W s group, HRP penetration was detected only in the coronal region of the PIE at 4 weeks, whereas in the straight-type, it was observed in the apical region and the connective tissue. At 16 weeks, the W s implants exhibited markedly less PIE down-growth than the Con, N s or H s implants, and were equivalent to that observed in natural teeth. Conclusion: The step-type implant system may have the potential for improving epithelial sealing at the tissue-implant interface, as well as reducing apical PIE down-growth, thus enhancing dental implant efficacy.

AB - Objective: Implant designs that can stimulate and integrate with an epithelial wound-healing process may significantly enhance the efficacy of dental implants. Here, we evaluated the potential of "step-type" implant systems to improve the sealing between the peri-implant epithelium (PIE) and the implant surface, and investigated the effect of implant structure on PIE down-growth. Materials and methods: Right maxillary first molars were extirpated from rats and implanted with either a straight-type or a step-type implant varying in step height and/or width (N s: 0.8mm height, 0.1mm width; W s: 0.8mm height, 0.2mm width; H s: 0.4mm height, 0.1mm width). Maxillae were harvested at various time points over 16 weeks to evaluate laminin-5 distribution as an indicator of wound healing and PIE formation, horse-radish peroxidase (HRP) penetration as a measurement of epithelial sealing, and PIE down-growth formation. Results: In all implant models, the PIE formed from the oral sulcular epithelium and spread apically along the implant surface. In the W s group, HRP penetration was detected only in the coronal region of the PIE at 4 weeks, whereas in the straight-type, it was observed in the apical region and the connective tissue. At 16 weeks, the W s implants exhibited markedly less PIE down-growth than the Con, N s or H s implants, and were equivalent to that observed in natural teeth. Conclusion: The step-type implant system may have the potential for improving epithelial sealing at the tissue-implant interface, as well as reducing apical PIE down-growth, thus enhancing dental implant efficacy.

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U2 - 10.1111/j.1600-0501.2011.02163.x

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JF - Clinical Oral Implants Research

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