Evidence of B cell clonal expansion in HIV type 1-infected patients

Yong Jeong, H. Ikematsu, I. Ariyama, K. Chijiwa, W. Li, K. Yamaji, S. Kashiwagi, J. Hayashi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

HIV-1 infection results in a gradual decrease in CD4+ T cell counts and progressive immune deficiency. Increased T cell turnover in HIV-1-infected patients, which can be interpreted as T cell clonal expansion, has been thought to be relevant to its pathogenesis. To investigate whether B cell clonal expansion also occurs in HIV-1-infected patients, we examined the expressed VHDJH gene sequences of peripheral B cells in HIV-1-infected patients with hypergammaglobulinemia. Identical VHDJH gene rearrangements with additional nucleotide differences in VH genes were analyzed as a marker of clonally related B cells. From healthy individuals and HIV-1-uninfected patients with hypergammaglobulinemia, clonally related B cells were detected in none of 10 (0%) and 2 of 10 (20%), respectively. No clonally related B cells were detected in any of the nine HIV-1-infected patients with detectable viral loads and normal Ig levels (0%). In contrast, from 9 of 14 HIV-1-infected patients with hypergammaglobulinemia (64%), clonally related B cells were detected. In addition, no HIV-1-infected patients who exhibited normal Ig levels after antiretroviral therapy had clonally related B cells. These findings suggest that B cell clonal expansion is present in HIV-1-infected patients with hypergammaglobulinemia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1507-1515
Number of pages9
JournalAIDS Research and Human Retroviruses
Volume17
Issue number16
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2001
Externally publishedYes

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HIV-1
B-Lymphocytes
Hypergammaglobulinemia
T-Lymphocytes
Gene Rearrangement
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Viral Load
Genes
HIV Infections
Nucleotides

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology
  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Jeong, Y., Ikematsu, H., Ariyama, I., Chijiwa, K., Li, W., Yamaji, K., ... Hayashi, J. (2001). Evidence of B cell clonal expansion in HIV type 1-infected patients. AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, 17(16), 1507-1515. https://doi.org/10.1089/08892220152644214

Evidence of B cell clonal expansion in HIV type 1-infected patients. / Jeong, Yong; Ikematsu, H.; Ariyama, I.; Chijiwa, K.; Li, W.; Yamaji, K.; Kashiwagi, S.; Hayashi, J.

In: AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, Vol. 17, No. 16, 01.01.2001, p. 1507-1515.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jeong, Y, Ikematsu, H, Ariyama, I, Chijiwa, K, Li, W, Yamaji, K, Kashiwagi, S & Hayashi, J 2001, 'Evidence of B cell clonal expansion in HIV type 1-infected patients', AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, vol. 17, no. 16, pp. 1507-1515. https://doi.org/10.1089/08892220152644214
Jeong, Yong ; Ikematsu, H. ; Ariyama, I. ; Chijiwa, K. ; Li, W. ; Yamaji, K. ; Kashiwagi, S. ; Hayashi, J. / Evidence of B cell clonal expansion in HIV type 1-infected patients. In: AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses. 2001 ; Vol. 17, No. 16. pp. 1507-1515.
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