Evidence of cell-fate conversion from hepatocytes to cholangiocytes in the injured liver: In-vivo genetic lineage-tracing approaches

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6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose of review Recently, it has been suggested that hepatocytes can potentially convert their fate into that of cholangiocytes when the liver receives an injury. This review concisely summarizes these new findings, especially those obtained in studies using cell-lineage tracing methods. Recent findings Recent advances in technologies using mutant mice with a tamoxifen-inducible Cre/loxP system have allowed heritable labeling of a particular type of cell and enabled us to follow the fate of their progeny. This is generally known as 'genetic lineage-tracing', and has been applied in various studies that require tracking of the fate of cells in living mice. Previous studies using these methods have revealed that hepatocytes themselves can give rise to cholangiocytes through Notch-mediated cell-fate conversion from hepatocytes to cholangiocytes in injured liver tissue and at the onset of liver cancer. Summary Intensive studies using in-vivo genetic lineage-tracing approaches have provided new insights into the nature of cellular identity and plasticity in the liver, which will contribute to the development of new therapeutic strategies for liver diseases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)247-251
Number of pages5
JournalCurrent Opinion in Gastroenterology
Volume31
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 27 2015

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Hepatocytes
Liver
Cell Tracking
Cell Lineage
Tamoxifen
Liver Neoplasms
Liver Diseases
Technology
Wounds and Injuries
Therapeutics
Cell Plasticity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

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title = "Evidence of cell-fate conversion from hepatocytes to cholangiocytes in the injured liver: In-vivo genetic lineage-tracing approaches",
abstract = "Purpose of review Recently, it has been suggested that hepatocytes can potentially convert their fate into that of cholangiocytes when the liver receives an injury. This review concisely summarizes these new findings, especially those obtained in studies using cell-lineage tracing methods. Recent findings Recent advances in technologies using mutant mice with a tamoxifen-inducible Cre/loxP system have allowed heritable labeling of a particular type of cell and enabled us to follow the fate of their progeny. This is generally known as 'genetic lineage-tracing', and has been applied in various studies that require tracking of the fate of cells in living mice. Previous studies using these methods have revealed that hepatocytes themselves can give rise to cholangiocytes through Notch-mediated cell-fate conversion from hepatocytes to cholangiocytes in injured liver tissue and at the onset of liver cancer. Summary Intensive studies using in-vivo genetic lineage-tracing approaches have provided new insights into the nature of cellular identity and plasticity in the liver, which will contribute to the development of new therapeutic strategies for liver diseases.",
author = "Atsushi Suzuki",
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T1 - Evidence of cell-fate conversion from hepatocytes to cholangiocytes in the injured liver

T2 - In-vivo genetic lineage-tracing approaches

AU - Suzuki, Atsushi

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N2 - Purpose of review Recently, it has been suggested that hepatocytes can potentially convert their fate into that of cholangiocytes when the liver receives an injury. This review concisely summarizes these new findings, especially those obtained in studies using cell-lineage tracing methods. Recent findings Recent advances in technologies using mutant mice with a tamoxifen-inducible Cre/loxP system have allowed heritable labeling of a particular type of cell and enabled us to follow the fate of their progeny. This is generally known as 'genetic lineage-tracing', and has been applied in various studies that require tracking of the fate of cells in living mice. Previous studies using these methods have revealed that hepatocytes themselves can give rise to cholangiocytes through Notch-mediated cell-fate conversion from hepatocytes to cholangiocytes in injured liver tissue and at the onset of liver cancer. Summary Intensive studies using in-vivo genetic lineage-tracing approaches have provided new insights into the nature of cellular identity and plasticity in the liver, which will contribute to the development of new therapeutic strategies for liver diseases.

AB - Purpose of review Recently, it has been suggested that hepatocytes can potentially convert their fate into that of cholangiocytes when the liver receives an injury. This review concisely summarizes these new findings, especially those obtained in studies using cell-lineage tracing methods. Recent findings Recent advances in technologies using mutant mice with a tamoxifen-inducible Cre/loxP system have allowed heritable labeling of a particular type of cell and enabled us to follow the fate of their progeny. This is generally known as 'genetic lineage-tracing', and has been applied in various studies that require tracking of the fate of cells in living mice. Previous studies using these methods have revealed that hepatocytes themselves can give rise to cholangiocytes through Notch-mediated cell-fate conversion from hepatocytes to cholangiocytes in injured liver tissue and at the onset of liver cancer. Summary Intensive studies using in-vivo genetic lineage-tracing approaches have provided new insights into the nature of cellular identity and plasticity in the liver, which will contribute to the development of new therapeutic strategies for liver diseases.

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