Evolution of Stalk/Spore Ratio in a Social Amoeba: Cell-to-Cell Interaction via a Signaling Chemical Shaped by Cheating Risk

Yoh Iwasa

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The cellular slime mold, or social amoeba, exists as a unicellular form that divides and multiplies rapidly. When food is depleted, cells aggregate to form a fruiting body within which cells differentiate into spores and stalks. Some spores succeed in dispersing to a new micro-habitat with plenty of food and in resuming a unicellular phase with fast population growth. In contrast, stalk cells lift spores to aid in their dispersal and then die, see Fig. 1 (left). Becoming a stalk cell is an altruistic behavior, see [2]. This system provides an ideal system for studying the maintenance of altruism.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationTrends in Mathematics
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages113-117
Number of pages5
Volume4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Publication series

NameTrends in Mathematics
Volume4
ISSN (Print)22970215
ISSN (Electronic)2297024X

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Mathematics(all)

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  • Cite this

    Iwasa, Y. (2015). Evolution of Stalk/Spore Ratio in a Social Amoeba: Cell-to-Cell Interaction via a Signaling Chemical Shaped by Cheating Risk. In Trends in Mathematics (Vol. 4, pp. 113-117). (Trends in Mathematics; Vol. 4). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-22129-8-20