Exacerbation of radiation induced meningioma due to hemorrhage after cerebral angiography: A case report

Shinya Yamaguchi, Satoshi O. Suzuki, Yoshihiro Matsuo, Toshio Uesaka, Koichiro Matsukado, Toru Iwaki

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We report the case of a 34-year-old woman who exhibited acute deterioration in her condition after cerebral angiography for evaluation of a large meningioma. She had undergone surgery and irradiation for a glioma in the right occipital lobe 23 years before this episode. She experienced incapacity at work. On CT and MRI. a large meningioma was detected on the left frontal convexity; this tumor was thought to be radiation-induced. Cerebral angiography was performed to assess the vascularization of the tumor. Her condition began to deteriorate 2.5 h after the cerebral angiography. CT revealed an increase in the mass of the tumor, and a high density area in the tumor We immediately removed the tumor. Histopathological examination revealed the tumor to be a meningothelial meningioma. New hemorrhagic foci were identified in the tumor. In addition, macrophages containing hemosiderin were detected, and some of the tumor vessels exhibited hyaline degeneration. We suspected that angiography triggered bleeding in the meningioma, which was already predisposed to hemorrhage.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)45-50
Number of pages6
JournalNeurological Surgery
Volume39
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2011

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

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    Yamaguchi, S., Suzuki, S. O., Matsuo, Y., Uesaka, T., Matsukado, K., & Iwaki, T. (2011). Exacerbation of radiation induced meningioma due to hemorrhage after cerebral angiography: A case report. Neurological Surgery, 39(1), 45-50.