Excessive level of inorganic nitrogen in groundwater in the intensively farmed areas of northern Vietnam

Kiyoshi Kurosawa, Do Nguyen Hai, Nguyen Huu Thanh, Ho Thi Lam Tra, Tran Thi Le Ha, Trinh Quang Huy, Kazuhiko Egashira

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ammonium-nitrogen (N) and nitrate-N concentrations in groundwater were monitored at three farming villages in northern Vietnam during 2002 and 2006 with 6-month intervals, where 380 to 420 kg/ha of chemical fertilizer N have been applied annually. With reference to the δ15N value, the source of N in the groundwater was identified as chemical fertilizer in the two villages and as animal waste and chemical fertilizer in the one village where animal waste fertilizer had been applied additionally. Ammonium-N concentration was alarmingly higher than the drinking water standards, whereas the nitrate-N concentration was lower. These concentrations did not increase over time. The effect of the natural groundwater recharge diluting the concentrations was considered as a potential reason, and such trends are expected to continue. Spatial variation in the ammonium-N and nitrate-N concentrations was recognized as being due to differences in the applied amount and the source of fertilizer N, respectively.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2053-2067
Number of pages15
JournalCommunications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis
Volume39
Issue number13-14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2008

Fingerprint

inorganic nitrogen
Vietnam
villages
animal wastes
groundwater
village
ammonium
nitrates
fertilizers
nitrate
nitrogen
nitrogen fertilizers
fertilizer
ammonium nitrogen
groundwater recharge
drinking water
spatial variation
recharge
farming systems
chemical fertiliser

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Soil Science

Cite this

Kurosawa, K., Hai, D. N., Thanh, N. H., Lam Tra, H. T., Le Ha, T. T., Huy, T. Q., & Egashira, K. (2008). Excessive level of inorganic nitrogen in groundwater in the intensively farmed areas of northern Vietnam. Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis, 39(13-14), 2053-2067. https://doi.org/10.1080/00103620802134990

Excessive level of inorganic nitrogen in groundwater in the intensively farmed areas of northern Vietnam. / Kurosawa, Kiyoshi; Hai, Do Nguyen; Thanh, Nguyen Huu; Lam Tra, Ho Thi; Le Ha, Tran Thi; Huy, Trinh Quang; Egashira, Kazuhiko.

In: Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis, Vol. 39, No. 13-14, 01.07.2008, p. 2053-2067.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kurosawa, Kiyoshi ; Hai, Do Nguyen ; Thanh, Nguyen Huu ; Lam Tra, Ho Thi ; Le Ha, Tran Thi ; Huy, Trinh Quang ; Egashira, Kazuhiko. / Excessive level of inorganic nitrogen in groundwater in the intensively farmed areas of northern Vietnam. In: Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis. 2008 ; Vol. 39, No. 13-14. pp. 2053-2067.
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AU - Egashira, Kazuhiko

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