Experimental investigation of temperature-dependent hysteresis of fishing-line artificial muscle (twisted and coiled polymer fiber) actuator

Hoshito Tanizaki, Kentaro Takagi, Chihaya Oiwa, Ken Masuya, Kenji Tahara, Toshihira Irisawa, Masatoshi Shioya, Kinji Asaka

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A fishing-line artificial muscle actuator is typically tested under a constant weight load. This paper reports a new hysteresis phenomenon discovered by changing both load weight and temperature applied to a fishing-line artificial muscle actuator. Obviously the equilibrium position of an actuator changes by load weight. Interestingly, the equilibrium position also largely changes when the actuator is firstly heated and cooled just after exchanging the load weight. In this paper we call this phenomenon as temperature-dependent hysteresis. We have observed that the magnitude of the temperature-dependent hysteresis in the experiment reached the same level as the thermal contraction and was not negligible.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationElectroactive Polymer Actuators and Devices (EAPAD) XXI
EditorsYoseph Bar-Cohen, Iain A. Anderson, Nancy L. Johnson
PublisherSPIE
ISBN (Electronic)9781510625877
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019
EventElectroactive Polymer Actuators and Devices (EAPAD) XXI 2019 - Denver, United States
Duration: Mar 4 2019Mar 7 2019

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume10966
ISSN (Print)0277-786X
ISSN (Electronic)1996-756X

Conference

ConferenceElectroactive Polymer Actuators and Devices (EAPAD) XXI 2019
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityDenver
Period3/4/193/7/19

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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