Exposure to chemical components of fine particulate matter and ozone, and placenta-mediated pregnancy complications in Tokyo: a register-based study

Takehiro Michikawa, Seiichi Morokuma, Shin Yamazaki, Akinori Takami, Seiji Sugata, Ayako Yoshino, Yuki Takeda, Kazushige Nakahara, Shinji Saito, Junya Hoshi, Kiyoko Kato, Hiroshi Nitta, Yuji Nishiwaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Maternal exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) was associated with pregnancy complications. However, we still lack comprehensive evidence regarding which specific chemical components of PM2.5 are more harmful for maternal and foetal health. Objective: We focused on exposure over the first trimester (0–13 weeks of gestation), which includes the early placentation period, and investigated whether PM2.5 and its components were associated with placenta-mediated pregnancy complications (combined outcome of small for gestational age, preeclampsia, placental abruption, and stillbirth). Methods: From 2013 to 2015, we obtained information, from the Japan Perinatal Registry Network database, on 83,454 women who delivered singleton infants within 23 Tokyo wards (≈627 km2). Using daily filter sampling of PM2.5 at one monitoring location, we analysed carbon and ion components, and assigned the first trimester average of the respective pollutant concentrations to each woman. Results: The ORs of placenta-mediated pregnancy complications were 1.14 (95% CI = 1.08–1.22) per 0.51 μg/m3 (interquartile range) increase of organic carbon and 1.11 (1.03–1.18) per 0.06 μg/m3 increase of sodium. Organic carbon was also associated with four individual complications. There was no association between ozone and outcome. Significance: There were specific components of PM2.5 that have adverse effects on maternal and foetal health.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Toxicology
  • Pollution
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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