Factors Influencing the Purchase Rate of Cartilage Conduction Hearing Aids

Tadashi Nishimura, Hiroshi Hosoi, Tomoko Sugiuchi, Nozomu Matsumoto, Takanori Nishiyama, Takano Kenichi, Satofumi Sugimoto, Hiroaki Yazama, Takeshi Sato, Masahiro Komori

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background Innovated hearing aids (HAs), termed cartilage conduction hearing aids (CC-HAs), show good performance in patients with closed ears and continuous otorrhea. However, factors other than the ear condition that influence the purchase rate of CC-HAs remain unclear. Purpose To identify the factors that influence the purchase rate of CC-HAs. Research Design A correlational study. Study Sample A total of 249 patients were enrolled. Data Collection and Analysis The patients' demographics, clinical characteristics, outcomes, and CC-HA transducer types were compared. The data were analyzed for six groups classified based on the ear condition. Results In the unilateral closed-ear group, the purchase cases were significantly younger than the nonpurchase cases (p < 0.05). Regarding the outcomes in the bilateral closed-ear group, the purchase cases showed significantly better-aided thresholds at 0.25 and 0.5 kHz than the nonpurchase cases. No significant differences in the functional gains and speech recognition scores were found between purchase and nonpurchase cases in all six groups. Regarding the transducer type, the continued-use rate of the simple transducer type was significantly lower in the bilateral chronic continuous otorrhea, bilateral open, and unilateral open groups. Conclusion In the closed ears, no remarkable negative factors were found. Transducer type had a significant influence on the continued-use rate in the nonclosed ears including the ears with chronic continuous otorrhea, although the purchase rate of CC-HAs in the bilateral chronic continuous otorrhea group was comparable to the closed ears.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Audiology
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2022

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Speech and Hearing

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