Fast and safe gas detection from underground coal fire by drone fly over

Lucila Dunnington, Masami Nakagawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Underground coal fires start naturally or as a result of human activities. Besides burning away the important non-renewable energy resource and causing financial losses, burning coal seams emit carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxide and methane, and is a leading cause of smog, acid rain, global warming, and air toxins. In the U.S. alone, the combined cost of coal-fire remediation projects that have been completed, budgeted, or projected by the U.S. Department of the Interior's Office of Surface Mining Remediation and Enforcement (OSM), exceeds $1 billion. It is estimated that these fires generate as much as 3% of the world's annual carbon dioxide emissions and consume as much as 5% of its minable coal. Considering the magnitude of environmental impact and economic loss caused by burning underground coal seams, we have developed a new, safe, reliable surface measurement of coal fire gases to assess the nature of underground coal fires. We use a drone mounted with gas sensors. Drone collected gas concentration data provides a safe alternative for evaluating the rank of a burning coal seam. In this study, a new method of determining coal rank by gas ratios is developed. Coal rank is valuable for defining parameters of a coal seam such as burn temperature, burn rate, and volume of burning seam.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)139-145
Number of pages7
JournalEnvironmental Pollution
Volume229
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

Coal
Diptera
Fires
Gases
Remediation
Carbon Dioxide
Carbon dioxide
Drones
Acid Rain
Smog
Global Warming
Open pit mining
Acid rain
Surface measurement
Methane
Global warming
Energy resources
Carbon Monoxide
Chemical sensors
Human Activities

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Toxicology
  • Pollution
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Fast and safe gas detection from underground coal fire by drone fly over. / Dunnington, Lucila; Nakagawa, Masami.

In: Environmental Pollution, Vol. 229, 01.01.2017, p. 139-145.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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