Feeding Arteries of Primary Tongue Cancers on Intra-arterial Infusion Chemotherapy

Takeshi Kamitani, Satoshi Kawanami, Yoshiki Asayama, Yoshio Matsuo, Masato Yonezawa, Yuzo Yamasaki, Michinobu Nagao, Torahiko Yamanouchi, Hidetake Yabuuchi, Katsumasa Nakamura, Torahiko Nakashima, Hiroshi Honda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the frequency and the predictive factor of each feeding artery on intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy (IAIC) in primary tongue cancer. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 20 patients who received IAIC for primary tongue cancer. The main and accompanying feeding arteries were identified on super-selective angiography of the branches of the external carotid artery. Tumor diameter, and extension to the contralateral side, tongue extrinsic muscles (TEMs), and lateral mesopharyngeal wall were determined based on magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography findings. Results: The main feeding artery was the ipsilateral lingual artery (LA) in 15 of the 20 examined tumors and the contralateral LA in the other 5. Ten cancers had only one feeding artery, and multiple feeding arteries were detected in the remaining 10. Tumors >4 cm (n = 9), those with extension to the contralateral side (n = 13), and those with extension to TEMs (n = 15) were supplied by significantly larger numbers of feeding arteries compared to tumors without these features (P = 0.01, 0.049, and 0.02, respectively). The frequency of feeding from the contralateral LA was 64 % (9/14) and 17 % (1/6) in tumors with and without extension to the contralateral side, respectively. Feeding from a facial artery (FA) was not detected in tumors ≤4 cm, while 5 of the 9 (56 %) tumors >4 cm were supplied by a FA (P = 0.01). Conclusion: A careful search for feeding arteries is required, especially in large tumors with extension to the contralateral side or to TEMs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)227-232
Number of pages6
JournalCardioVascular and Interventional Radiology
Volume39
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2016

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Tongue Neoplasms
Intra Arterial Infusions
Arteries
Drug Therapy
Tongue
Neoplasms
Muscles
External Carotid Artery

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Feeding Arteries of Primary Tongue Cancers on Intra-arterial Infusion Chemotherapy. / Kamitani, Takeshi; Kawanami, Satoshi; Asayama, Yoshiki; Matsuo, Yoshio; Yonezawa, Masato; Yamasaki, Yuzo; Nagao, Michinobu; Yamanouchi, Torahiko; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Nakashima, Torahiko; Honda, Hiroshi.

In: CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology, Vol. 39, No. 2, 01.02.2016, p. 227-232.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kamitani, Takeshi ; Kawanami, Satoshi ; Asayama, Yoshiki ; Matsuo, Yoshio ; Yonezawa, Masato ; Yamasaki, Yuzo ; Nagao, Michinobu ; Yamanouchi, Torahiko ; Yabuuchi, Hidetake ; Nakamura, Katsumasa ; Nakashima, Torahiko ; Honda, Hiroshi. / Feeding Arteries of Primary Tongue Cancers on Intra-arterial Infusion Chemotherapy. In: CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology. 2016 ; Vol. 39, No. 2. pp. 227-232.
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abstract = "Purpose: To evaluate the frequency and the predictive factor of each feeding artery on intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy (IAIC) in primary tongue cancer. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 20 patients who received IAIC for primary tongue cancer. The main and accompanying feeding arteries were identified on super-selective angiography of the branches of the external carotid artery. Tumor diameter, and extension to the contralateral side, tongue extrinsic muscles (TEMs), and lateral mesopharyngeal wall were determined based on magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography findings. Results: The main feeding artery was the ipsilateral lingual artery (LA) in 15 of the 20 examined tumors and the contralateral LA in the other 5. Ten cancers had only one feeding artery, and multiple feeding arteries were detected in the remaining 10. Tumors >4 cm (n = 9), those with extension to the contralateral side (n = 13), and those with extension to TEMs (n = 15) were supplied by significantly larger numbers of feeding arteries compared to tumors without these features (P = 0.01, 0.049, and 0.02, respectively). The frequency of feeding from the contralateral LA was 64 {\%} (9/14) and 17 {\%} (1/6) in tumors with and without extension to the contralateral side, respectively. Feeding from a facial artery (FA) was not detected in tumors ≤4 cm, while 5 of the 9 (56 {\%}) tumors >4 cm were supplied by a FA (P = 0.01). Conclusion: A careful search for feeding arteries is required, especially in large tumors with extension to the contralateral side or to TEMs.",
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T1 - Feeding Arteries of Primary Tongue Cancers on Intra-arterial Infusion Chemotherapy

AU - Kamitani, Takeshi

AU - Kawanami, Satoshi

AU - Asayama, Yoshiki

AU - Matsuo, Yoshio

AU - Yonezawa, Masato

AU - Yamasaki, Yuzo

AU - Nagao, Michinobu

AU - Yamanouchi, Torahiko

AU - Yabuuchi, Hidetake

AU - Nakamura, Katsumasa

AU - Nakashima, Torahiko

AU - Honda, Hiroshi

PY - 2016/2/1

Y1 - 2016/2/1

N2 - Purpose: To evaluate the frequency and the predictive factor of each feeding artery on intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy (IAIC) in primary tongue cancer. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 20 patients who received IAIC for primary tongue cancer. The main and accompanying feeding arteries were identified on super-selective angiography of the branches of the external carotid artery. Tumor diameter, and extension to the contralateral side, tongue extrinsic muscles (TEMs), and lateral mesopharyngeal wall were determined based on magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography findings. Results: The main feeding artery was the ipsilateral lingual artery (LA) in 15 of the 20 examined tumors and the contralateral LA in the other 5. Ten cancers had only one feeding artery, and multiple feeding arteries were detected in the remaining 10. Tumors >4 cm (n = 9), those with extension to the contralateral side (n = 13), and those with extension to TEMs (n = 15) were supplied by significantly larger numbers of feeding arteries compared to tumors without these features (P = 0.01, 0.049, and 0.02, respectively). The frequency of feeding from the contralateral LA was 64 % (9/14) and 17 % (1/6) in tumors with and without extension to the contralateral side, respectively. Feeding from a facial artery (FA) was not detected in tumors ≤4 cm, while 5 of the 9 (56 %) tumors >4 cm were supplied by a FA (P = 0.01). Conclusion: A careful search for feeding arteries is required, especially in large tumors with extension to the contralateral side or to TEMs.

AB - Purpose: To evaluate the frequency and the predictive factor of each feeding artery on intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy (IAIC) in primary tongue cancer. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 20 patients who received IAIC for primary tongue cancer. The main and accompanying feeding arteries were identified on super-selective angiography of the branches of the external carotid artery. Tumor diameter, and extension to the contralateral side, tongue extrinsic muscles (TEMs), and lateral mesopharyngeal wall were determined based on magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography findings. Results: The main feeding artery was the ipsilateral lingual artery (LA) in 15 of the 20 examined tumors and the contralateral LA in the other 5. Ten cancers had only one feeding artery, and multiple feeding arteries were detected in the remaining 10. Tumors >4 cm (n = 9), those with extension to the contralateral side (n = 13), and those with extension to TEMs (n = 15) were supplied by significantly larger numbers of feeding arteries compared to tumors without these features (P = 0.01, 0.049, and 0.02, respectively). The frequency of feeding from the contralateral LA was 64 % (9/14) and 17 % (1/6) in tumors with and without extension to the contralateral side, respectively. Feeding from a facial artery (FA) was not detected in tumors ≤4 cm, while 5 of the 9 (56 %) tumors >4 cm were supplied by a FA (P = 0.01). Conclusion: A careful search for feeding arteries is required, especially in large tumors with extension to the contralateral side or to TEMs.

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