Finite Element Analysis of Articular Cartilage Model Considering the Configuration and Biphasic Property of the Tissue

N. Hosoda, N. Sakai, Yoshinori Sawae, T. Murakami

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Articular cartilage tissue has high water content from 70 to 80% and shows biphasic behavior in which both solid and fluid properties should be considered. Furthermore, the mechanical behavior of cartilage shows depth-dependence. Therefore it is necessary to consider not only the average tissue property but also the local one to explain mechanical and functional behavior. Previously, we created cartilage tissue model considering the depth-dependence of Young's modulus distribution and applied two-dimensional finite element method (FEM) based on biphasic theory[1]. As a result, the deformed profile of depth-dependent Young's modulus model immediately after unconfined compression corresponded to actual profile. Consequently, we confirmed that Young's modulus has a distribution in the depth direction. In contrast, the total load capacity in FEM analysis was about one order lower than the experimental one. Immediately after compression at high rate, it has not enough time for intrinsic fluid to flow in cartilage, and thus whole tissue including intrinsic fluid shows the behavior like elastic body. Furthermore, the polymeric materials increase their stiffness at higher strain rate. Therefore, apparent elastic modulus is assumed to be larger than the equilibrium Young's modulus. During total deflection is maintained after compression, the intrinsic fluid flow gradually occurs, and the stress relaxes with decrease of apparent elastic modulus. After enough stress relaxation, an apparent elastic modulus becomes an equilibrium Young's modulus. We think this is connected to configuration of the cartilage tissue. The aim of this study is to consider configuration of the tissue in addition to the character of biphasic property on the mechanical behavior of cartilage tissue. In this study, we created cartilage tissue model considering spring elements that express function arisen from collagen fiber and Young's modulus distribution depending on the depth. Then, we analyzed the unconfined compression and compared experimental results to FEM analysis.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication13th International Conference on Biomedical Engineering - ICBME 2008
Pages1883-1887
Number of pages5
Volume23
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2009
Event13th International Conference on Biomedical Engineering, ICBME 2008 - , Singapore
Duration: Dec 3 2008Dec 6 2008

Other

Other13th International Conference on Biomedical Engineering, ICBME 2008
CountrySingapore
Period12/3/0812/6/08

Fingerprint

Cartilage
Elastic moduli
Tissue
Finite element method
Fluids
Stress relaxation
Collagen
Water content
Flow of fluids
Strain rate
Stiffness
Fibers
Polymers

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Bioengineering

Cite this

Hosoda, N., Sakai, N., Sawae, Y., & Murakami, T. (2009). Finite Element Analysis of Articular Cartilage Model Considering the Configuration and Biphasic Property of the Tissue. In 13th International Conference on Biomedical Engineering - ICBME 2008 (Vol. 23, pp. 1883-1887) https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-92841-6_467

Finite Element Analysis of Articular Cartilage Model Considering the Configuration and Biphasic Property of the Tissue. / Hosoda, N.; Sakai, N.; Sawae, Yoshinori; Murakami, T.

13th International Conference on Biomedical Engineering - ICBME 2008. Vol. 23 2009. p. 1883-1887.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Hosoda, N, Sakai, N, Sawae, Y & Murakami, T 2009, Finite Element Analysis of Articular Cartilage Model Considering the Configuration and Biphasic Property of the Tissue. in 13th International Conference on Biomedical Engineering - ICBME 2008. vol. 23, pp. 1883-1887, 13th International Conference on Biomedical Engineering, ICBME 2008, Singapore, 12/3/08. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-92841-6_467
Hosoda N, Sakai N, Sawae Y, Murakami T. Finite Element Analysis of Articular Cartilage Model Considering the Configuration and Biphasic Property of the Tissue. In 13th International Conference on Biomedical Engineering - ICBME 2008. Vol. 23. 2009. p. 1883-1887 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-92841-6_467
Hosoda, N. ; Sakai, N. ; Sawae, Yoshinori ; Murakami, T. / Finite Element Analysis of Articular Cartilage Model Considering the Configuration and Biphasic Property of the Tissue. 13th International Conference on Biomedical Engineering - ICBME 2008. Vol. 23 2009. pp. 1883-1887
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