FLT3 mutations in normal karyotype acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission treated with autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation

G. Yoshimoto, K. Nagafuji, T. Miyamoto, N. Kinukawa, K. Takase, T. Eto, K. Kato, S. Hayashi, T. Kamimura, Y. Ohno, S. Taniguchi, M. Harada

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22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We retrospectively analysed the significance of FLT3 mutations in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) having a normal karyotype, who were treated with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (auto-PBSCT). In all, 34 patients with normal karyotype AML in first complete remission receiving high-dose chemotherapy and auto-PBSCT were analysed based on the presence or absence of FLT3/ITDs and FLT3/D835. They were 16 males and 18 females and with a median age of 41.5 years. FLT3/ITDs were detected in eight of 34 patients (23.5 %), and FLT3 D835 mutations in two of 34 patients (5.9%). White blood cell count (P=0.0087), serum concentration of lactate dehydrogenase (P=0.005), and percentages of peripheral blood (P=0.0131) and bone marrow (BM) blasts (P=0.0312) were significantly higher in patients showing the FLT3 mutations. Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were similar between patients with or without FLT3 mutations (5 year DFS, 67.5 vs 68.55%, P=0.819; 5 year OS, 64.81 vs 78.88%, P=0.4457, by the log-rank test). FLT3 mutations demonstrate no further prognostic impact in patients with normal karyotype AML in first CR treated with high-dose chemotherapy and auto-PBSCT. Myeloablative chemotherapy supported by auto-PBSCT may overcome any poor prognostic implications of FLT3 mutations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)977-983
Number of pages7
JournalBone Marrow Transplantation
Volume36
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2005

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Hematology
  • Transplantation

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