Fluxgate gradiometer for magnetic nanoparticle magnetorelaxometry in unshielded environment

Ahmed Lotfy Elrefai Mohamed Mohamed Farag, Ichiro Sasada, Takashi Yoshida

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The detection of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is essential for applications in biomedicine, specifically in the detection of biological targets such as disease-related proteins and cells, known as magnetic immunoassay [1]. The size of the MNPs varies within a few to tens of nanometers; hence, their sizes are comparable to cells, viruses and proteins. This means that, with proper treatment, MNPs (magnetic markers) can provide a method of 'marking' or addressing specific biological entities. With the use of magnetic immunoassay, we can perform immunoassays in the liquid phase; where the bound and unbound markers can be magnetically distinguished by exploiting the difference in the Brownian relaxation time between bound and unbound markers without needing to perform a time-consuming washing process [2].

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2015 IEEE International Magnetics Conference, INTERMAG 2015
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
ISBN (Electronic)9781479973224
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2015
Event2015 IEEE International Magnetics Conference, INTERMAG 2015 - Beijing, China
Duration: May 11 2015May 15 2015

Other

Other2015 IEEE International Magnetics Conference, INTERMAG 2015
CountryChina
CityBeijing
Period5/11/155/15/15

Fingerprint

Nanoparticles
Proteins
Viruses
Washing
Relaxation time
Liquids

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Farag, A. L. E. M. M., Sasada, I., & Yoshida, T. (2015). Fluxgate gradiometer for magnetic nanoparticle magnetorelaxometry in unshielded environment. In 2015 IEEE International Magnetics Conference, INTERMAG 2015 [7156945] Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/INTMAG.2015.7156945

Fluxgate gradiometer for magnetic nanoparticle magnetorelaxometry in unshielded environment. / Farag, Ahmed Lotfy Elrefai Mohamed Mohamed; Sasada, Ichiro; Yoshida, Takashi.

2015 IEEE International Magnetics Conference, INTERMAG 2015. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2015. 7156945.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Farag, ALEMM, Sasada, I & Yoshida, T 2015, Fluxgate gradiometer for magnetic nanoparticle magnetorelaxometry in unshielded environment. in 2015 IEEE International Magnetics Conference, INTERMAG 2015., 7156945, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2015 IEEE International Magnetics Conference, INTERMAG 2015, Beijing, China, 5/11/15. https://doi.org/10.1109/INTMAG.2015.7156945
Farag ALEMM, Sasada I, Yoshida T. Fluxgate gradiometer for magnetic nanoparticle magnetorelaxometry in unshielded environment. In 2015 IEEE International Magnetics Conference, INTERMAG 2015. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. 2015. 7156945 https://doi.org/10.1109/INTMAG.2015.7156945
Farag, Ahmed Lotfy Elrefai Mohamed Mohamed ; Sasada, Ichiro ; Yoshida, Takashi. / Fluxgate gradiometer for magnetic nanoparticle magnetorelaxometry in unshielded environment. 2015 IEEE International Magnetics Conference, INTERMAG 2015. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2015.
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