Freezing of cells; role of ice and solutes in cell damage

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The mechanism of cellular damage associated with freezing of biological cells is discussed by summarizing the author's recent studies that consists of four different types of experiments. The "solution effects" that designate the influence of elevated concentration of electrolytes during freezing is examined first by a nonfreezing experiment that exposes cells to hypertonic solutions using a perfusion microscope. The cell damage due to the solution effect is evaluated directly from a pseudo-freezing experiment, where cells were subjected to the milieu that simulated a freeze-thaw process in the absence of ice. Contribution of ice formed in the extracellular solution is then estimated from the difference in cell survival between the pseudo-freezing experiment and a corresponding freezing experiment. The cellular injury by the mechanical stress is also examined independently by a cell deformation experiment, which mimicked the situation that cells are compressed and deformed between ice crystals. This experiment was designed to examine a complex effect of mechanical stress from ice and elevated concentration of electrolytes. Based on all these experiments, the role of concentrated solutes and ice is revealed as a function of freezing conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2007 Proceedings of the ASME/JSME Thermal Engineering Summer Heat Transfer Conference - HT 2007
Pages903-912
Number of pages10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2007
Event2007 ASME/JSME Thermal Engineering Summer Heat Transfer Conference, HT 2007 - Vancouver, BC, Canada
Duration: Jul 8 2007Jul 12 2007

Publication series

Name2007 Proceedings of the ASME/JSME Thermal Engineering Summer Heat Transfer Conference - HT 2007
Volume3

Other

Other2007 ASME/JSME Thermal Engineering Summer Heat Transfer Conference, HT 2007
CountryCanada
CityVancouver, BC
Period7/8/077/12/07

Fingerprint

Freezing
freezing
Ice
solutes
ice
Cells
damage
cells
Experiments
electrolytes
Electrolytes
microscopes
Microscopes
Crystals
crystals

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Takamatsu, H. (2007). Freezing of cells; role of ice and solutes in cell damage. In 2007 Proceedings of the ASME/JSME Thermal Engineering Summer Heat Transfer Conference - HT 2007 (pp. 903-912). (2007 Proceedings of the ASME/JSME Thermal Engineering Summer Heat Transfer Conference - HT 2007; Vol. 3). https://doi.org/10.1115/HT2007-32250

Freezing of cells; role of ice and solutes in cell damage. / Takamatsu, Hiroshi.

2007 Proceedings of the ASME/JSME Thermal Engineering Summer Heat Transfer Conference - HT 2007. 2007. p. 903-912 (2007 Proceedings of the ASME/JSME Thermal Engineering Summer Heat Transfer Conference - HT 2007; Vol. 3).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Takamatsu, H 2007, Freezing of cells; role of ice and solutes in cell damage. in 2007 Proceedings of the ASME/JSME Thermal Engineering Summer Heat Transfer Conference - HT 2007. 2007 Proceedings of the ASME/JSME Thermal Engineering Summer Heat Transfer Conference - HT 2007, vol. 3, pp. 903-912, 2007 ASME/JSME Thermal Engineering Summer Heat Transfer Conference, HT 2007, Vancouver, BC, Canada, 7/8/07. https://doi.org/10.1115/HT2007-32250
Takamatsu H. Freezing of cells; role of ice and solutes in cell damage. In 2007 Proceedings of the ASME/JSME Thermal Engineering Summer Heat Transfer Conference - HT 2007. 2007. p. 903-912. (2007 Proceedings of the ASME/JSME Thermal Engineering Summer Heat Transfer Conference - HT 2007). https://doi.org/10.1115/HT2007-32250
Takamatsu, Hiroshi. / Freezing of cells; role of ice and solutes in cell damage. 2007 Proceedings of the ASME/JSME Thermal Engineering Summer Heat Transfer Conference - HT 2007. 2007. pp. 903-912 (2007 Proceedings of the ASME/JSME Thermal Engineering Summer Heat Transfer Conference - HT 2007).
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