Functional analyses of mammalian protein kinase C isozymes in budding yeast and mammalian fibroblasts

Satoshi Nomoto, Yasuyuki Watanabe, Jun Ninomiya-Tsuji, Li Xia Yang, Kazutoshi Kiuchi, Masatoshi Hagiwara, Hiroyoshi Hidaka, Kunihiro Matsumoto, Kenji Irie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: The PKC1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a homologue of mammalian protein kinase C (PKC) that is required for yeast cell growth. Pkc1 has been proposed to regulate a protein kinase cascade which includes the Bck1, Mkk1/Mkk2 and Mpk1 kinases. The functional relationship between Pkc1 and mammalian PKCs is unknown. Another signal transduction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the mating pheromone signalling pathway, is mediated by a heterotrimeric G protein, and causes cell cycle arrest in the G1 interval. It is not clear whether PKC is involved in this pathway. The effects of over-expression of PKCs in mammalian cells have been widely studied to analyse the function of PKCs in vivo. Results: We isolated a human cDNA which encodes a protein kinase C type η (PKC-η) by complementation of pkc1 mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The human PKC-η was able to complement the growth defect caused by the deletion of PKC1, whereas PKC-η was unable to suppress the defect caused by deletion of BCK1. We also isolated human cDNAs that can suppress the adaptation defect of sst2. One of them encodes a protein kinase C type δ (PKC-δ). Expression of this gene in yeast stimulated an adaptation to the pheromone response. Human PKC-δ suppressed the adaptation defect of a pheromone receptor mutation lacking its C-terminal domain, but not that of a G protein β-subunit mutation eliminating signal-induced phosphorylation, and not the lethality of the gpa1 null mutation. Moreover, overexpression of PKC-η in NIH3T3 cells induced anchorage-independent growth. Conclusions: PKC-η has a biological activity which is closely related to Pkc1, and PKC-η activates the Pkc1-mediated pathway through an activation of the Bck1 kinase that is a homologue of MAP kinase kinase kinase. PKC-η appears to play a critical role in growth control of yeast and mammalian cells. Suppression experiments with PKC-δ suggest that PKC-δ desensitizes the pathway by regulating an aspect of G protein function.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)601-614
Number of pages14
JournalGenes to Cells
Volume2
Issue number10
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 1997

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Saccharomycetales
Protein Kinase C
Isoenzymes
Fibroblasts
Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Mutation
Yeasts
Pheromones
Growth
GTP-Binding Proteins
Phosphotransferases
Pheromone Receptors
Complementary DNA
G1 Phase Cell Cycle Checkpoints
MAP Kinase Kinase Kinases
Heterotrimeric GTP-Binding Proteins
Protein Subunits
Protein Kinases
Signal Transduction

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Genetics
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Nomoto, S., Watanabe, Y., Ninomiya-Tsuji, J., Yang, L. X., Kiuchi, K., Hagiwara, M., ... Irie, K. (1997). Functional analyses of mammalian protein kinase C isozymes in budding yeast and mammalian fibroblasts. Genes to Cells, 2(10), 601-614.

Functional analyses of mammalian protein kinase C isozymes in budding yeast and mammalian fibroblasts. / Nomoto, Satoshi; Watanabe, Yasuyuki; Ninomiya-Tsuji, Jun; Yang, Li Xia; Kiuchi, Kazutoshi; Hagiwara, Masatoshi; Hidaka, Hiroyoshi; Matsumoto, Kunihiro; Irie, Kenji.

In: Genes to Cells, Vol. 2, No. 10, 01.12.1997, p. 601-614.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nomoto, S, Watanabe, Y, Ninomiya-Tsuji, J, Yang, LX, Kiuchi, K, Hagiwara, M, Hidaka, H, Matsumoto, K & Irie, K 1997, 'Functional analyses of mammalian protein kinase C isozymes in budding yeast and mammalian fibroblasts', Genes to Cells, vol. 2, no. 10, pp. 601-614.
Nomoto S, Watanabe Y, Ninomiya-Tsuji J, Yang LX, Kiuchi K, Hagiwara M et al. Functional analyses of mammalian protein kinase C isozymes in budding yeast and mammalian fibroblasts. Genes to Cells. 1997 Dec 1;2(10):601-614.
Nomoto, Satoshi ; Watanabe, Yasuyuki ; Ninomiya-Tsuji, Jun ; Yang, Li Xia ; Kiuchi, Kazutoshi ; Hagiwara, Masatoshi ; Hidaka, Hiroyoshi ; Matsumoto, Kunihiro ; Irie, Kenji. / Functional analyses of mammalian protein kinase C isozymes in budding yeast and mammalian fibroblasts. In: Genes to Cells. 1997 ; Vol. 2, No. 10. pp. 601-614.
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abstract = "Background: The PKC1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a homologue of mammalian protein kinase C (PKC) that is required for yeast cell growth. Pkc1 has been proposed to regulate a protein kinase cascade which includes the Bck1, Mkk1/Mkk2 and Mpk1 kinases. The functional relationship between Pkc1 and mammalian PKCs is unknown. Another signal transduction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the mating pheromone signalling pathway, is mediated by a heterotrimeric G protein, and causes cell cycle arrest in the G1 interval. It is not clear whether PKC is involved in this pathway. The effects of over-expression of PKCs in mammalian cells have been widely studied to analyse the function of PKCs in vivo. Results: We isolated a human cDNA which encodes a protein kinase C type η (PKC-η) by complementation of pkc1 mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The human PKC-η was able to complement the growth defect caused by the deletion of PKC1, whereas PKC-η was unable to suppress the defect caused by deletion of BCK1. We also isolated human cDNAs that can suppress the adaptation defect of sst2. One of them encodes a protein kinase C type δ (PKC-δ). Expression of this gene in yeast stimulated an adaptation to the pheromone response. Human PKC-δ suppressed the adaptation defect of a pheromone receptor mutation lacking its C-terminal domain, but not that of a G protein β-subunit mutation eliminating signal-induced phosphorylation, and not the lethality of the gpa1 null mutation. Moreover, overexpression of PKC-η in NIH3T3 cells induced anchorage-independent growth. Conclusions: PKC-η has a biological activity which is closely related to Pkc1, and PKC-η activates the Pkc1-mediated pathway through an activation of the Bck1 kinase that is a homologue of MAP kinase kinase kinase. PKC-η appears to play a critical role in growth control of yeast and mammalian cells. Suppression experiments with PKC-δ suggest that PKC-δ desensitizes the pathway by regulating an aspect of G protein function.",
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AU - Watanabe, Yasuyuki

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AU - Kiuchi, Kazutoshi

AU - Hagiwara, Masatoshi

AU - Hidaka, Hiroyoshi

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AB - Background: The PKC1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a homologue of mammalian protein kinase C (PKC) that is required for yeast cell growth. Pkc1 has been proposed to regulate a protein kinase cascade which includes the Bck1, Mkk1/Mkk2 and Mpk1 kinases. The functional relationship between Pkc1 and mammalian PKCs is unknown. Another signal transduction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the mating pheromone signalling pathway, is mediated by a heterotrimeric G protein, and causes cell cycle arrest in the G1 interval. It is not clear whether PKC is involved in this pathway. The effects of over-expression of PKCs in mammalian cells have been widely studied to analyse the function of PKCs in vivo. Results: We isolated a human cDNA which encodes a protein kinase C type η (PKC-η) by complementation of pkc1 mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The human PKC-η was able to complement the growth defect caused by the deletion of PKC1, whereas PKC-η was unable to suppress the defect caused by deletion of BCK1. We also isolated human cDNAs that can suppress the adaptation defect of sst2. One of them encodes a protein kinase C type δ (PKC-δ). Expression of this gene in yeast stimulated an adaptation to the pheromone response. Human PKC-δ suppressed the adaptation defect of a pheromone receptor mutation lacking its C-terminal domain, but not that of a G protein β-subunit mutation eliminating signal-induced phosphorylation, and not the lethality of the gpa1 null mutation. Moreover, overexpression of PKC-η in NIH3T3 cells induced anchorage-independent growth. Conclusions: PKC-η has a biological activity which is closely related to Pkc1, and PKC-η activates the Pkc1-mediated pathway through an activation of the Bck1 kinase that is a homologue of MAP kinase kinase kinase. PKC-η appears to play a critical role in growth control of yeast and mammalian cells. Suppression experiments with PKC-δ suggest that PKC-δ desensitizes the pathway by regulating an aspect of G protein function.

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