Further assessment of atrial fibrillation as a risk factor for gastroesophageal reflux disease: A multicenter questionnaire survey

Satoko Kubota, Gen Nakaji, Hideki Shimazu, Keita Odashiro, Toru Maruyama, Koichi Akashi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective Although both atrial fibrillation (AF) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are common diseases, the relationship between these two conditions remains controversial, depending on the study design and type of AF. Therefore, we focused on the relationship between nonvalvular AF and GERD. Methods A total of 479 consecutive subjects (255 men and 224 women, mean age: 60.4 ± 12.8 years), including outpatients at several hospitals (n=201) and participants of an annual health screening program (n=278), were enrolled. Subjects with valvular AF, malignancy or dementia were excluded. The frequency scale for symptoms of GERD (F-scale) was applied after obtaining each patient's informed consent for screening symptomatic GERD with a total cutoff score of 8 points. The score on the questionnaire was correlated with the baseline characteristics extracted from the patients' medical records. Results The total F-scale scores were significantly higher in the older patients (≥60 years) than in the younger patients (<60 years) (p=0.017) and increased in the following order: permanent AF > paroxysmal AF > sinus rhythm (p=0.003). The incidence of GERD increased in the same order among the patients with the various heart rhythm classifications (p<0.001). Coronary heart disease, hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia were not correlated with the F-scale scores or incidence of GERD. The stepwise discriminant analyses demonstrated that nonvalvular AF alone was significantly associated with symptomatic GERD (Wilks' lambda=0.983, p=0.004). Conclusion This multicenter study demonstrated that nonvalvular AF is significantly correlated with symptomatic GERD. This small sample survey warrants a future study of a large-scale cohort.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2401-2407
Number of pages7
JournalInternal Medicine
Volume52
Issue number21
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 11 2013

Fingerprint

Gastroesophageal Reflux
Atrial Fibrillation
Surveys and Questionnaires
Incidence
Discriminant Analysis
Dyslipidemias
Informed Consent
Multicenter Studies
Medical Records
Coronary Disease
Dementia
Outpatients
Hypertension
Health
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Further assessment of atrial fibrillation as a risk factor for gastroesophageal reflux disease : A multicenter questionnaire survey. / Kubota, Satoko; Nakaji, Gen; Shimazu, Hideki; Odashiro, Keita; Maruyama, Toru; Akashi, Koichi.

In: Internal Medicine, Vol. 52, No. 21, 11.11.2013, p. 2401-2407.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{c7758484a99144048dba7b36444d6e3f,
title = "Further assessment of atrial fibrillation as a risk factor for gastroesophageal reflux disease: A multicenter questionnaire survey",
abstract = "Objective Although both atrial fibrillation (AF) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are common diseases, the relationship between these two conditions remains controversial, depending on the study design and type of AF. Therefore, we focused on the relationship between nonvalvular AF and GERD. Methods A total of 479 consecutive subjects (255 men and 224 women, mean age: 60.4 ± 12.8 years), including outpatients at several hospitals (n=201) and participants of an annual health screening program (n=278), were enrolled. Subjects with valvular AF, malignancy or dementia were excluded. The frequency scale for symptoms of GERD (F-scale) was applied after obtaining each patient's informed consent for screening symptomatic GERD with a total cutoff score of 8 points. The score on the questionnaire was correlated with the baseline characteristics extracted from the patients' medical records. Results The total F-scale scores were significantly higher in the older patients (≥60 years) than in the younger patients (<60 years) (p=0.017) and increased in the following order: permanent AF > paroxysmal AF > sinus rhythm (p=0.003). The incidence of GERD increased in the same order among the patients with the various heart rhythm classifications (p<0.001). Coronary heart disease, hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia were not correlated with the F-scale scores or incidence of GERD. The stepwise discriminant analyses demonstrated that nonvalvular AF alone was significantly associated with symptomatic GERD (Wilks' lambda=0.983, p=0.004). Conclusion This multicenter study demonstrated that nonvalvular AF is significantly correlated with symptomatic GERD. This small sample survey warrants a future study of a large-scale cohort.",
author = "Satoko Kubota and Gen Nakaji and Hideki Shimazu and Keita Odashiro and Toru Maruyama and Koichi Akashi",
year = "2013",
month = "11",
day = "11",
doi = "10.2169/internalmedicine.52.0923",
language = "English",
volume = "52",
pages = "2401--2407",
journal = "Internal Medicine",
issn = "0918-2918",
publisher = "Japanese Society of Internal Medicine",
number = "21",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Further assessment of atrial fibrillation as a risk factor for gastroesophageal reflux disease

T2 - A multicenter questionnaire survey

AU - Kubota, Satoko

AU - Nakaji, Gen

AU - Shimazu, Hideki

AU - Odashiro, Keita

AU - Maruyama, Toru

AU - Akashi, Koichi

PY - 2013/11/11

Y1 - 2013/11/11

N2 - Objective Although both atrial fibrillation (AF) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are common diseases, the relationship between these two conditions remains controversial, depending on the study design and type of AF. Therefore, we focused on the relationship between nonvalvular AF and GERD. Methods A total of 479 consecutive subjects (255 men and 224 women, mean age: 60.4 ± 12.8 years), including outpatients at several hospitals (n=201) and participants of an annual health screening program (n=278), were enrolled. Subjects with valvular AF, malignancy or dementia were excluded. The frequency scale for symptoms of GERD (F-scale) was applied after obtaining each patient's informed consent for screening symptomatic GERD with a total cutoff score of 8 points. The score on the questionnaire was correlated with the baseline characteristics extracted from the patients' medical records. Results The total F-scale scores were significantly higher in the older patients (≥60 years) than in the younger patients (<60 years) (p=0.017) and increased in the following order: permanent AF > paroxysmal AF > sinus rhythm (p=0.003). The incidence of GERD increased in the same order among the patients with the various heart rhythm classifications (p<0.001). Coronary heart disease, hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia were not correlated with the F-scale scores or incidence of GERD. The stepwise discriminant analyses demonstrated that nonvalvular AF alone was significantly associated with symptomatic GERD (Wilks' lambda=0.983, p=0.004). Conclusion This multicenter study demonstrated that nonvalvular AF is significantly correlated with symptomatic GERD. This small sample survey warrants a future study of a large-scale cohort.

AB - Objective Although both atrial fibrillation (AF) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are common diseases, the relationship between these two conditions remains controversial, depending on the study design and type of AF. Therefore, we focused on the relationship between nonvalvular AF and GERD. Methods A total of 479 consecutive subjects (255 men and 224 women, mean age: 60.4 ± 12.8 years), including outpatients at several hospitals (n=201) and participants of an annual health screening program (n=278), were enrolled. Subjects with valvular AF, malignancy or dementia were excluded. The frequency scale for symptoms of GERD (F-scale) was applied after obtaining each patient's informed consent for screening symptomatic GERD with a total cutoff score of 8 points. The score on the questionnaire was correlated with the baseline characteristics extracted from the patients' medical records. Results The total F-scale scores were significantly higher in the older patients (≥60 years) than in the younger patients (<60 years) (p=0.017) and increased in the following order: permanent AF > paroxysmal AF > sinus rhythm (p=0.003). The incidence of GERD increased in the same order among the patients with the various heart rhythm classifications (p<0.001). Coronary heart disease, hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia were not correlated with the F-scale scores or incidence of GERD. The stepwise discriminant analyses demonstrated that nonvalvular AF alone was significantly associated with symptomatic GERD (Wilks' lambda=0.983, p=0.004). Conclusion This multicenter study demonstrated that nonvalvular AF is significantly correlated with symptomatic GERD. This small sample survey warrants a future study of a large-scale cohort.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84887084478&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84887084478&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2169/internalmedicine.52.0923

DO - 10.2169/internalmedicine.52.0923

M3 - Article

C2 - 24190143

AN - SCOPUS:84887084478

VL - 52

SP - 2401

EP - 2407

JO - Internal Medicine

JF - Internal Medicine

SN - 0918-2918

IS - 21

ER -