Future of glass melting through the in-flight melting technique

S. Inoue, Takayuki Watanabe, T. Yano, O. Sakamoto, K. Satoh, S. Kawachi, T. Iseda

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The principle of the in-flight glass melting technique is reviewed and the future of the industrial glass melting is discussed based on the achievements of the on-going project on the development of the in-flight glass melting technology. In the in-flight melting, a granular batch is charged directly into a burner flame. The heat transfer from heating source to a glass batch is enhanced very much and the glass melting energy can be saved by more than 50% of the current glass tank furnaces. The innovative glass melting technique will trigger the revolution in glass production to push the glass industry into a new era. The technique can also reduce the melting furnace sizes, which will contribute to the reduction of furnace construction cost. The standard soda-lime-silica glass composition can be melted using only an oxy-gas firing burner. The oxy-gas burner can be combined with an are plasma torch to compose the hybrid heating in the new technique. The hybrid heating source can generate higher temperature than the burner heating and is applicable to the melting of high liquidus temperature glass forming systems. The feature will enable the production of the new functional glasses which are difficult to be fabricated by the currently popular Siemens type melting furnaces.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProcessing, Properties, and Applications of Glass and Optical Materials - Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Advances in the Fusion and Processing of Glass, AFPG9
Pages37-44
Number of pages8
Publication statusPublished - Sep 25 2012
Event9th International Conference on Advances in the Fusion and Processing of Glass, AFPG9 and Symposium 15 - Structure, Properties and Photonic Applications of Glasses Held during PACRIM-9 - Cairns, QLD, Australia
Duration: Jul 10 2011Jul 14 2011

Publication series

NameCeramic Transactions
Volume231
ISSN (Print)1042-1122

Other

Other9th International Conference on Advances in the Fusion and Processing of Glass, AFPG9 and Symposium 15 - Structure, Properties and Photonic Applications of Glasses Held during PACRIM-9
CountryAustralia
CityCairns, QLD
Period7/10/117/14/11

Fingerprint

Melting
Glass
Fuel burners
Heating
Melting furnaces
Furnaces
Gas burners
Glass industry
Plasma torches
Fused silica
Lime
Gases
Heat transfer
Temperature
Chemical analysis
Costs

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

Inoue, S., Watanabe, T., Yano, T., Sakamoto, O., Satoh, K., Kawachi, S., & Iseda, T. (2012). Future of glass melting through the in-flight melting technique. In Processing, Properties, and Applications of Glass and Optical Materials - Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Advances in the Fusion and Processing of Glass, AFPG9 (pp. 37-44). (Ceramic Transactions; Vol. 231).

Future of glass melting through the in-flight melting technique. / Inoue, S.; Watanabe, Takayuki; Yano, T.; Sakamoto, O.; Satoh, K.; Kawachi, S.; Iseda, T.

Processing, Properties, and Applications of Glass and Optical Materials - Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Advances in the Fusion and Processing of Glass, AFPG9. 2012. p. 37-44 (Ceramic Transactions; Vol. 231).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Inoue, S, Watanabe, T, Yano, T, Sakamoto, O, Satoh, K, Kawachi, S & Iseda, T 2012, Future of glass melting through the in-flight melting technique. in Processing, Properties, and Applications of Glass and Optical Materials - Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Advances in the Fusion and Processing of Glass, AFPG9. Ceramic Transactions, vol. 231, pp. 37-44, 9th International Conference on Advances in the Fusion and Processing of Glass, AFPG9 and Symposium 15 - Structure, Properties and Photonic Applications of Glasses Held during PACRIM-9, Cairns, QLD, Australia, 7/10/11.
Inoue S, Watanabe T, Yano T, Sakamoto O, Satoh K, Kawachi S et al. Future of glass melting through the in-flight melting technique. In Processing, Properties, and Applications of Glass and Optical Materials - Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Advances in the Fusion and Processing of Glass, AFPG9. 2012. p. 37-44. (Ceramic Transactions).
Inoue, S. ; Watanabe, Takayuki ; Yano, T. ; Sakamoto, O. ; Satoh, K. ; Kawachi, S. ; Iseda, T. / Future of glass melting through the in-flight melting technique. Processing, Properties, and Applications of Glass and Optical Materials - Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Advances in the Fusion and Processing of Glass, AFPG9. 2012. pp. 37-44 (Ceramic Transactions).
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