Garnet phase of MgSiO3 filling the pyroxene-ilmenite gap at very high temperature

Takumi Kato, Mineo Kumazawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

73 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Melting experiments on MgSiO3, the major constituent of the Earth's mantle and planetary interiors, have now been conducted at a static pressure of 20 GPa. These experiments reveal the presence of a new garnet-like non-cubic phase of MgSiO3, which melts congruently at 2,250°C. This new silicate phase and its stability have significant implications for mantle mineralogy, chemical fractionation by partial melting and also for the occurrence of aluminium-deficient cubic garnet (majorite) in shocked meteorites. These high-pressure experiments at temperatures 2,000°C have been made possible by the development of a large-volume high-pressure device at Nagoya University1-4.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)803-805
Number of pages3
JournalNature
Volume316
Issue number6031
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 1985

Fingerprint

Pressure
Freezing
Temperature
Chemical Fractionation
Meteoroids
Silicates
Aluminum
Equipment and Supplies
ilmenite
pyroxene

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Cite this

Garnet phase of MgSiO3 filling the pyroxene-ilmenite gap at very high temperature. / Kato, Takumi; Kumazawa, Mineo.

In: Nature, Vol. 316, No. 6031, 01.12.1985, p. 803-805.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kato, Takumi ; Kumazawa, Mineo. / Garnet phase of MgSiO3 filling the pyroxene-ilmenite gap at very high temperature. In: Nature. 1985 ; Vol. 316, No. 6031. pp. 803-805.
@article{a164ef3c0c534dedbd953350f0a9c603,
title = "Garnet phase of MgSiO3 filling the pyroxene-ilmenite gap at very high temperature",
abstract = "Melting experiments on MgSiO3, the major constituent of the Earth's mantle and planetary interiors, have now been conducted at a static pressure of 20 GPa. These experiments reveal the presence of a new garnet-like non-cubic phase of MgSiO3, which melts congruently at 2,250°C. This new silicate phase and its stability have significant implications for mantle mineralogy, chemical fractionation by partial melting and also for the occurrence of aluminium-deficient cubic garnet (majorite) in shocked meteorites. These high-pressure experiments at temperatures 2,000°C have been made possible by the development of a large-volume high-pressure device at Nagoya University1-4.",
author = "Takumi Kato and Mineo Kumazawa",
year = "1985",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/316803a0",
language = "English",
volume = "316",
pages = "803--805",
journal = "Nature",
issn = "0028-0836",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "6031",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Garnet phase of MgSiO3 filling the pyroxene-ilmenite gap at very high temperature

AU - Kato, Takumi

AU - Kumazawa, Mineo

PY - 1985/12/1

Y1 - 1985/12/1

N2 - Melting experiments on MgSiO3, the major constituent of the Earth's mantle and planetary interiors, have now been conducted at a static pressure of 20 GPa. These experiments reveal the presence of a new garnet-like non-cubic phase of MgSiO3, which melts congruently at 2,250°C. This new silicate phase and its stability have significant implications for mantle mineralogy, chemical fractionation by partial melting and also for the occurrence of aluminium-deficient cubic garnet (majorite) in shocked meteorites. These high-pressure experiments at temperatures 2,000°C have been made possible by the development of a large-volume high-pressure device at Nagoya University1-4.

AB - Melting experiments on MgSiO3, the major constituent of the Earth's mantle and planetary interiors, have now been conducted at a static pressure of 20 GPa. These experiments reveal the presence of a new garnet-like non-cubic phase of MgSiO3, which melts congruently at 2,250°C. This new silicate phase and its stability have significant implications for mantle mineralogy, chemical fractionation by partial melting and also for the occurrence of aluminium-deficient cubic garnet (majorite) in shocked meteorites. These high-pressure experiments at temperatures 2,000°C have been made possible by the development of a large-volume high-pressure device at Nagoya University1-4.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0022225824&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0022225824&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/316803a0

DO - 10.1038/316803a0

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0022225824

VL - 316

SP - 803

EP - 805

JO - Nature

JF - Nature

SN - 0028-0836

IS - 6031

ER -