Global climate change driven by soot at the K-Pg boundary as the cause of the mass extinction

Kunio Kaiho, Naga Oshima, Kouji Adachi, Yukimasa Adachi, Takuya Mizukami, Megumu Fujibayashi, Ryosuke Saito

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The mass extinction of life 66 million years ago at the Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary, marked by the extinctions of dinosaurs and shallow marine organisms, is important because it led to the macroevolution of mammals and appearance of humans. The current hypothesis for the extinction is that an asteroid impact in present-day Mexico formed condensed aerosols in the stratosphere, which caused the cessation of photosynthesis and global near-freezing conditions. Here, we show that the stratospheric aerosols did not induce darkness that resulted in milder cooling than previously thought. We propose a new hypothesis that latitude-dependent climate changes caused by massive stratospheric soot explain the known mortality and survival on land and in oceans at the Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary. The stratospheric soot was ejected from the oil-rich area by the asteroid impact and was spread globally. The soot aerosols caused sufficiently colder climates at mid-high latitudes and drought with milder cooling at low latitudes on land, in addition to causing limited cessation of photosynthesis in global oceans within a few months to two years after the impact, followed by surface-water cooling in global oceans in a few years. The rapid climate change induced terrestrial extinctions followed by marine extinctions over several years.

Original languageEnglish
Article number28427
JournalScientific reports
Volume6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 14 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

mass extinction
soot
global climate
extinction
climate change
global ocean
aerosol
cooling
asteroid
photosynthesis
dinosaur
stratosphere
freezing
mammal
drought
surface water
mortality
oil
climate
ocean

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Cite this

Global climate change driven by soot at the K-Pg boundary as the cause of the mass extinction. / Kaiho, Kunio; Oshima, Naga; Adachi, Kouji; Adachi, Yukimasa; Mizukami, Takuya; Fujibayashi, Megumu; Saito, Ryosuke.

In: Scientific reports, Vol. 6, 28427, 14.07.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kaiho, Kunio ; Oshima, Naga ; Adachi, Kouji ; Adachi, Yukimasa ; Mizukami, Takuya ; Fujibayashi, Megumu ; Saito, Ryosuke. / Global climate change driven by soot at the K-Pg boundary as the cause of the mass extinction. In: Scientific reports. 2016 ; Vol. 6.
@article{2c95de9106ae4fee9359b140ce99cd05,
title = "Global climate change driven by soot at the K-Pg boundary as the cause of the mass extinction",
abstract = "The mass extinction of life 66 million years ago at the Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary, marked by the extinctions of dinosaurs and shallow marine organisms, is important because it led to the macroevolution of mammals and appearance of humans. The current hypothesis for the extinction is that an asteroid impact in present-day Mexico formed condensed aerosols in the stratosphere, which caused the cessation of photosynthesis and global near-freezing conditions. Here, we show that the stratospheric aerosols did not induce darkness that resulted in milder cooling than previously thought. We propose a new hypothesis that latitude-dependent climate changes caused by massive stratospheric soot explain the known mortality and survival on land and in oceans at the Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary. The stratospheric soot was ejected from the oil-rich area by the asteroid impact and was spread globally. The soot aerosols caused sufficiently colder climates at mid-high latitudes and drought with milder cooling at low latitudes on land, in addition to causing limited cessation of photosynthesis in global oceans within a few months to two years after the impact, followed by surface-water cooling in global oceans in a few years. The rapid climate change induced terrestrial extinctions followed by marine extinctions over several years.",
author = "Kunio Kaiho and Naga Oshima and Kouji Adachi and Yukimasa Adachi and Takuya Mizukami and Megumu Fujibayashi and Ryosuke Saito",
year = "2016",
month = "7",
day = "14",
doi = "10.1038/srep28427",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
journal = "Scientific Reports",
issn = "2045-2322",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Global climate change driven by soot at the K-Pg boundary as the cause of the mass extinction

AU - Kaiho, Kunio

AU - Oshima, Naga

AU - Adachi, Kouji

AU - Adachi, Yukimasa

AU - Mizukami, Takuya

AU - Fujibayashi, Megumu

AU - Saito, Ryosuke

PY - 2016/7/14

Y1 - 2016/7/14

N2 - The mass extinction of life 66 million years ago at the Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary, marked by the extinctions of dinosaurs and shallow marine organisms, is important because it led to the macroevolution of mammals and appearance of humans. The current hypothesis for the extinction is that an asteroid impact in present-day Mexico formed condensed aerosols in the stratosphere, which caused the cessation of photosynthesis and global near-freezing conditions. Here, we show that the stratospheric aerosols did not induce darkness that resulted in milder cooling than previously thought. We propose a new hypothesis that latitude-dependent climate changes caused by massive stratospheric soot explain the known mortality and survival on land and in oceans at the Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary. The stratospheric soot was ejected from the oil-rich area by the asteroid impact and was spread globally. The soot aerosols caused sufficiently colder climates at mid-high latitudes and drought with milder cooling at low latitudes on land, in addition to causing limited cessation of photosynthesis in global oceans within a few months to two years after the impact, followed by surface-water cooling in global oceans in a few years. The rapid climate change induced terrestrial extinctions followed by marine extinctions over several years.

AB - The mass extinction of life 66 million years ago at the Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary, marked by the extinctions of dinosaurs and shallow marine organisms, is important because it led to the macroevolution of mammals and appearance of humans. The current hypothesis for the extinction is that an asteroid impact in present-day Mexico formed condensed aerosols in the stratosphere, which caused the cessation of photosynthesis and global near-freezing conditions. Here, we show that the stratospheric aerosols did not induce darkness that resulted in milder cooling than previously thought. We propose a new hypothesis that latitude-dependent climate changes caused by massive stratospheric soot explain the known mortality and survival on land and in oceans at the Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary. The stratospheric soot was ejected from the oil-rich area by the asteroid impact and was spread globally. The soot aerosols caused sufficiently colder climates at mid-high latitudes and drought with milder cooling at low latitudes on land, in addition to causing limited cessation of photosynthesis in global oceans within a few months to two years after the impact, followed by surface-water cooling in global oceans in a few years. The rapid climate change induced terrestrial extinctions followed by marine extinctions over several years.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84978699401&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84978699401&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/srep28427

DO - 10.1038/srep28427

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84978699401

VL - 6

JO - Scientific Reports

JF - Scientific Reports

SN - 2045-2322

M1 - 28427

ER -